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California Department of Public Health

Picture of Joe Rubin
How an agency charged with protecting public health gave talking points to the lead-battery industry.
Picture of Samantha Caiola
A lack of mental health professionals in rural counties is made worse by high rates of substance abuse, financial stress and isolation, which contribute to depression.
Picture of Joe Rubin
Are California regulators in denial about the dangers of lead? The state's response to previous lead-poisoning crises raise plenty of doubts.
Picture of Leonardo Castaneda
A data-driven look at opioid addiction in San Diego found that old assumptions about addiction hotspots were outdated. Reporter Leo Castaneda shares this and other field lessons he learned along the way.
Picture of Paul Sisson

Are California hospitals doing a better job of preventing serious mistakes in the wake of a state program that issues high-profile penalties for such errors? One reporter finds reasons for doubt in the data.

Picture of Samuel White Swan-Perkins

A reporter sets out to investigate the impact of the federally funded program for Women, Infants, and Children on Native families. Is the diet made possible by the program doing more harm than good in California's Native American communities?

Picture of William Heisel

If you have a story that needs to be told, don't wait for a huge attachment to show up in your inbox. Hunt for the data that will help you tell your story. And keep in mind that a data expert can be an invaluable guide along the way.

Picture of Paul Sisson

Starting in 2007, California’s hospital administrative penalties program was designed to bring greater accountability to hospitals that commit “never events” and put patients in immediate jeopardy. So, what does the data tell us about how well it's working?

Picture of William Heisel

It just got even easier to see whether your hospital has a significant infection problem. If state and federal agencies were racing to provide the most useful information in the simplest to understand format, Hospital Compare just took the lead.

Picture of William Heisel

Online maps make cool tools, but do they foster cleaner, safer health care? The public knowledge and peer pressure they create can be powerful forces to get hospitals addressing their infection problems.

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Domestic violence affects tens of millions of Americans every year. Yet media outlets mostly treat incidents as "cops" items, if they cover them at all, as opposed to treating domestic violence as a public health problem. Our free two-day symposium will help journalists understand the root causes and promising prevention, intervention and treatment approaches.  Plus participants will be able to apply for grants to report California-focused projects.

The pandemic has unleashed a tsunami of misinformation, lies and half-truths capable of proliferating faster than the virus itself. In our next webinar, we’ll delve into what one of our speakers has termed “the natural ecology of bullshit” — how to spot it, how it spreads, who is most impacted, and how to counter it. And we’ll discuss reporting examples, strategies and story ideas that incorporate these insights and effectively communicate to diverse audiences. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the Uited States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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