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California Endowment

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Diving deep into data can be daunting for journalists on deadline. Our new e-book on community health and data reporting makes it a lot easier.

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This week, check out a handful of print openings at publications of various health disciplines. Also, keep an eye on upcoming deadlines for our 2012 fellowships and grants — these opportunities are not to be missed.

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We figure that Reporting on Health can stay innovative and relevant to you by constantly adapting to your ideas and the enormous changes reshaping the media and health landscape around us. Please answer our survey to help with our next steps. 

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Deadlines are fast approaching for this year's National Health Journalism Fellowship, Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism Grant and the inaugural Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health Journalism Fund Grant. Don't miss out on these opportunities.

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What is health? How does it impact my neighborhood? What can we do about it? What is a healthy community?

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In 2007, San Francisco embarked on a rare and bold experiment, resolving to provide universal health care to its residents. Four years later, Healthy San Francisco has an enrollment of 54,000 people — between half and three-quarters of the estimated uninsured population. But the city has dug deep, and the program has earned less than expected from other sources. Can this ambitious program be sustained financially? The short answer, after a three-month investigation by the San Francisco Public Press: yes — but only if the economy picks up, federal grants continue to flow and businesses stop fighting health care mandates. The project, produced with the support of the USC Annenberg/California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship, appeared in November at SFPublicPress.org and as the cover story of the Public Press' quarterly broadsheet newspaper edition.

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In 2007, San Francisco embarked on a rare and bold experiment, resolving to provide universal health care to its residents. Four years later, Healthy San Francisco has an enrollment of 54,000 people — between half and three-quarters of the estimated uninsured population. But the city has dug deep

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"Food deserts" — geographic areas that don’t have access to fresh, affordable, healthy food, such as fruits and vegetables — are often covered from an angle that reports simply on the fact that produce is lacking. But there are plenty of angles to take when tackling this tough subject. Here are just a few.

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Though it is clear that South Los Angeles is park poor compared to rest of Los Angeles County, current fiscal problems lend people to dismiss the idea of spending more money creating parks, adding trees or fixing sidewalks. Turns out that maybe Los Angeles can’t afford not to invest in more nature.

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How does a new park in Culver City become a destination, while the urban trail of Stocker Corridor is overlooked by many of its own nearby residents?

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Join us to hear from two of the best on the COVID beat: Helen Branswell of STAT and Katherine J. Wu of The Atlantic will share their strategies and tips for staying ahead of an ever-changing story. Sign-up here!

Our California Fellowship supports reporters in the Golden State pursuing ambitious projects on overlooked health and health equity issues.

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