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California

Picture of Peter Johnson
Research shows that as hospitals fall under fewer ownership umbrellas, prices can rise — and at significantly higher rates than their more modestly sized competitors.
Picture of Larry Buhl
Only a small percentage of Americans who could benefit from the PrEP pill are using it, despite its effectiveness.
Picture of Meredith Cooper
In December, when people started to be allowed to return to their homes — if they were standing — benzene was discovered in the water supply.
Picture of Lee Romney
Darryl Lester was at his mom’s place in Tacoma, Washington, when a letter he’d been waiting for arrived in the mail. At 40, he was destitute, in pain and out of work.
Picture of David Washburn
We were about 30 seconds into our first look at the California Department of Education’s chronic absenteeism data when we knew what our story would be.
Picture of Laura Wenus
Advocates warn that people who need nursing care may increasingly be sent far away from San Francisco in a developing shortage of affordable nursing home beds.
Picture of Laura Wenus
This story was produced as part of a larger project led by Laura Wenus, a participant in the 2019 California Fellowship, a program of USC Annenberg's Center for Health Journalism. Other stories in this series include: Nursing Care Expected To Worsen As California Ages Nursing Care Crunch Puts The On
Picture of Kerry Klein
A reporter shares a handful of investigative reporting techniques that proved essential in overcoming blind spots among local health experts who were largely unaware of opioids' toll in their communities.
Picture of Deidre McPhillips
An apparent link between risky behavior and bias-related bullying tends to be stronger in California’s more segregated counties.
Picture of Teresa Cotsirilos
Climate change is fueling increasingly extreme weather events, and someone needs to defend communities against them and clean up after them. In California, that person is often a low-wage immigrant worker.

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