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Picture of Linda Marsa

Clearly, I don't have access to Jobs' medical records and this is all pure speculation. But there was an interesting article in this week's Newsweek by Sharon Begley that raises the issue that the treatments Jobs embarked on for his illness may have in fact hastened his demise.

Picture of Rochelle Sharpe

I just posted the story that I wrote for The Center for Public Integrity, which focuses on how much money Medicare spends on unnecessary cancer screenings. It was a fascinating reporting journey and one that you may be able to partially replicate, as the debate heats up about the necessity of prostate cancer screening tests.

Picture of Rochelle Sharpe

An iWatch News investigation documents $1.9 billion in wasted federal health care expenditures.

Picture of Beatrice Motamedi

To a teen living in the rough areas of East Oakland, sorrow is no stranger. Random violence, worry about the future and a constant battle for basics such as healthy food or good schools add up to a kind of life that can make an East Oakland teen far older than his or her chronological age.

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What the American Cancer Society is doing to improve the care of uninsured individuals with cancer.

Picture of Dan Lee

Doctors tend to shy away from using the word "cure" and cancer in the same sentence, but a wealth of promising research and medical developments in recent years has been extending lives and reducing the incidence of some cancers.

Science has produced the HPV vaccine to prevent a virus linked to cervical cancer as well as breakthrough drugs like Herceptin and Tamoxifen to keep breast cancer from recurring.

The overall cancer death rate fell 16 percent from its peak in 1991 to 2006, the latest year for which the American Cancer Society has information.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

ReportingonHealth's TalkBack blog recently highlighted media coverage of a new st

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U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

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