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cardiovascular diseases

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Sometimes, the simplest tools in medicine are the ones that give us the most useful information. Take the humble blood pressure machine, for example. It's been around for years, and it's cheap, compared with a lot of other medical devices. It's simple to use, and it doesn't require a medical or a nursing degree to operate. But the numbers it reports are valuable in helping predict a person's risk of a host of medical problems, including heart failure, stroke and kidney failure, and can help doctors determine whether a person really needs to take medicine to control his or her high blood pressure.

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With limited access to affordable fruits, vegetables and other healthy foods, Mexicans living in New York are frequenting fast food restaurants instead of farmers' markets. The result is a spike in obesity and diabetes among this immigrant group.

This story was originally published in Spanish. Below is the English translation.

Part 3: In a sedentary country

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But the only way doctors and patients and their families will get a really accurate handle on prognosis with current therapies is if a huge prospective study is undertaken or at least a national registry that includes tens of thousands of patients seen at many academic centers and those seen in the community by both cardiologists and general practitioners.

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Dr. Aouizerat's research is centered on understanding the quantitative genetics (genomics) of common human disease. He is interested in accelerating the translation of discoveries in basic science genetics (the bench) to clinical practice (the bedside). Of particular interest to his lab is the role of common genetic variations in dyslipidemia, a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Currently, he is investigating four clinical populations with discrete cardiovascular diseases: familial combined hyperlipidemia, hypoalphalipoproteinemia, hyperalphalipoproteinmia and normolipidemic controls.

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