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Picture of Stephanie Lee

For two years, Alameda County officials and public health providers traveled to Cuba to study nationalized health care - a system that spends relatively little, but emphasizes primary and preventative care, and enjoys low infant mortality, long life expectancies and other strong health measures.

Picture of Kent Bottles

Anyone who is concerned about the future transformation of the United States clinical delivery system should pay attention to the Care Innovations Summit.

Picture of Philip Graitcer

For more than 100 years, Atlanta's Grady Hospital has been the health care provider for the region's poor and uninsured, but in 2007, it faced a crisis. Philip Graitcer investigates.

Picture of Angilee Shah

Health Care Brands president Dr. Jason Schiffman works at the intersections of psychiatry, consumer information, business and online health care. And he's happy to be there.

Picture of Hillary Meeks

Tulare County, a poor, semi-rural county in California's Central Valley, has a one-third of its population on Medi-Cal — California's version of Medicaid. This is more than any other county in the state, yet the resources to care for the Medi-Cal population are few.

Picture of Mark Taylor

This story is Part 14 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

When Shantray Hooks, of Gary, lost her job as a restaurant cook in August, she didn’t know how she would pay for doctor visits.

“I had no health insurance and I couldn’t afford to pay a doctor,” said Hooks, 29, who was diagnosed with diabetes several years ago.

A doctor referred her to the Community Health Net of Gary, a federally qualified community health center that provides comprehensive primary care health services and charges on a sliding fee scale for services.

Picture of Mark Taylor

This story is Part 11 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

Nearly 33 years after the federal government designated Gary a health professional shortage area and 17 years after federal health authorities qualified it as a medically underserved area, Gary continues to suffer from physician shortages.

Those shortages are partially to blame for the poor health status of many Gary citizens, according to local doctors and hospital officials.

Gary is home to disproportionately high numbers of severely ill patients suffering from multiple potentially life threatening conditions, including heart disease, kidney failure, diabetes, hypertension, obesity and asthma.

Picture of Mark Taylor

This story is Part 3 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

Picture of Sarah Arnquist

Despite being for-profit institutions, Sierra Vista and Twin Cities Community Hospital lead the way in providing care to those less fortunate in the region.

Picture of Jim Johnson

The future of Natividad

Part 1: On the verge of closure: Natividad's financial struggles threten its existence

Part 2: Turning around a public safety-net hospital: A last-ditch effort to save Natividad suceeds beyond expectations

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