Skip to main content.

CDC

Picture of William Heisel

I wouldn’t blame you if you thought the only thing that happened in the health sphere this year was the implosion of Healthcare.gov. There was some excellent reporting on the problems with the Affordable Care Act, but here are some stories you might have missed.

Picture of William Heisel

Valley fever hasn’t generated significant research funding. What will help move the needle? A sustained effort by public health advocates, clinicians and patients and their families and continued attention from media outlets.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Hollywood stars, like Glee’s Cory Monteith, aren’t the only Americans struggling with addiction that kills. Monteith, who died of a heroin and alcohol overdose earlier this month, exemplifies the public health tragedy that is opioid overdose deaths in America.

Picture of Linda Marsa

Prolonged hot streaks can wither crops, buckle roads, cause train derailments when metal tracks warp in the heat, and trigger power outages because of the high demand for electricity. But the most profound effect of unflaggingly high temperatures is on our health.

Picture of William Heisel

The Reporting on Health Collaborative heard earlier this week that Rep. Kevin McCarthy, R-Bakersfield, was going to meet with the head of the Centers for Disease Control and then issue a statement. Is that itself worth a story?

Picture of William Heisel

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 36 states have operational Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs that look for patients who are trying to feed an addiction. Only a handful track doctors who are prescribing outside the norm.

Picture of William Heisel

I rarely read an entire story on my phone, but when I saw the headline Dirty medical needles put tens of thousands at risk in USA TODAY on Thursday, I had to click through all nine pages of it.

Picture of William Heisel

Here's a look at the four broad categories of surveys globally -- what information can reporters glean from them and what limitations do they need to note.

Picture of William Heisel

Tracking basic human events has an incredible downstream effect on measuring and making sense of health trends. Vital registration helps policymakers take targeted action to improve health. For example, the CDC has a National Birth Defects Prevention Study that relies partly on birth certificates.

Picture of Jill  Braden Balderas

Even with major initiatives from such high-profile entities as the NFL and First Lady Michelle Obama pounding the message of exercising and healthy eating, childhood obesity in the U.S shows few signs of abating. Could more influential policy be the answer?

Pages

Announcements

This year saw a scorcher of a summer, the hottest on record. Worse, it could be the coldest summer we’ll see in our lifetimes. In this webinar, we’ll glean lessons and insights from a yearlong Los Angeles Times investigation into extreme heat. We’ll also identify gaps in state and federal tracking efforts, and outline policy changes that could help. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism's Impact Funds provide reporting support — funding and mentoring — to journalists who think big and want to make a difference. 

Apply today for our National Impact Fund for reporting on health equity and health systems across the country. 

Apply today for our California Impact Fund for reporting that brings untold stories to light in the Golden State. 

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth