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There are no confirmed human deaths linked to toxins produced by cyanobacteria, commonly known as blue-green algae, in the U.S., but in the wake of reports of dogs dying from ingesting these toxins, people are worried about the potential harm to humans.

Picture of Stephanie Baer

It took less than 30 minutes for the 2-year-old golden retriever to die. One moment, the dog was swimming alongside her owners' canoe. The next, she was seizing and foaming at the mouth. Experts say toxic algae is a rising threat in California waters.

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A recent survey of students in Buffalo revealed that roughly one in three had seen someone shot, stabbed or assaulted in their neighborhood. The crisis is all the more harrowing given what we're learning about childhood trauma's life-long effects on health and well-being.

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Young people are suffering from mental health problems in unprecedented numbers — it's a problem that deserves a dedicated, thorough and sensitive investigation, says journalist Gisela Telis.

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Infant mortality may be one of the most cold, impersonal terms out there, especially when what we're talking about is dying babies....

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Comparing HIV-prevention efforts in three California counties reveals the complexities involved in trying to stop the spread of HIV and AIDS once and for all.

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Tennessee was one of four states that recently passed important new laws taking aim at the country's high maternal death rate. Yet you’d be hard pressed to find out about the legislation from reading the news.

Picture of William Heisel

Our ability to pinpoint the causes behind the big increases in drug overdose deaths in recent years rest largely on one lowly piece of paperwork: the death certificate.

Picture of William Heisel

Sometimes a big percentage increase is an exciting story that your audience should hear about, but it also might be a puff of smoke obscuring a flimsy story, as recent news suggests.

Picture of Ryan White

Researchers published a study this week that describes an uptick in reports of playground brain injuries. Although the increase was negligible, much of the media coverage failed to put the risks in context.

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Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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