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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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Two communities, one urban, one rural, trying to improve the health of residents

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Elizabeth A. Bancroft, M.D., S.M., has been a medical epidemiologist in the Acute Communicable Disease Control Program of the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health since August 2001. Since 2003, she has gained national media attention because of her work on communityassociated MRSA. This attention was magnified in fall 2007 with her editorial on MRSA in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Dr. Bancroft is chief of the county department's invasive bacterialdisease, hepatitis, and antimicrobial resistance unit.

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LaVonna Blair Lewis, Ph.D., MPH, is a Teaching Associate Professor at the USC School of Policy, Planning, and Development.   Dr. Lewis joined the USC faculty in 1996 and she was selected Professor of the Year at the school in 1998 and 2001. She has a Ph.D. in political science from Rice University.

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Maxine Liggins is an Area Medical Director for the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. The Service Planning Areas in which she works include the wealthiest and the poorest residents of Los Angeles County. Public Health’s mission of “improving the quality of life for the residents of Los Angeles County” serves as a yardstick to measure the quality of health services provided in the Los Angeles County. Dr.

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Maryn McKenna has lived inside the "hot zone" for much of her reporting career. She honed her craft at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, where she was much admired for her coverage of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It takes skill to persuade any large government agency to give up some of its secrets, but McKenna did just that and turned them into fascinating stories. She has since taken the enviable career path of writing books.

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Part 2: Researchers trying to find why people with disease fail to act against it. 

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Part 1: Innovative ways are sought to get patients to follow their treatment 

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While reporting for a four-part series on the wide gap in life expectancies and disease rates between people in nearby neighborhoods – due to drastically different conditions and social status – I expected to find that health care reform legislation would do little to address this issue. The reform legislation, after all, is primarily about health care insurance. But I was surprised to find that, for the first time, Congressional legislation contains at least $3.4 billion to focus on improving health disparities.

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Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are among the most common infections in the United States, with more than 19 million Americans affected every year. according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

As parents and politicians have debated the merits of abstinence-only sex education programs and a controversial new vaccine for HPV, infection rates among youths have remained steady and high.

One in four teen girls now has an STD, putting them at risk for infertility and even cancer. Updated: March 2010.

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The nation's top infectious disease specialist will join us for a conversation with national health reporter Dan Diamond of The Washington Post. We’ll talk about the evolving threat posed by monkeypox, the current state of the COVID pandemic, and broader lessons on how we respond to emerging diseases. Sign-up here!

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