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Central Valley

Picture of Pauline Bartolone

When I left for a week of reporting in rural California in late February, I didn't know I would come back with two stories about the devastating health consequences of isolation.

I'm not just talking about the geographic isolation one finds in a remote area. From the hilly evergreen landscape of eastern Shasta County, to the agricultural flatlands of Tulare County in the South Central Valley, I witnessed how isolation can leave people in the dark about keeping healthy, lead to emotional despair, and pose real barriers to quality of life.

Picture of Kristen Natividad

Those with experience writing for a health professionals might be interested in this week's featured opportunity. Also, check out the Awards section for more deadlines this weekend; there's still time to get your entries in.

Picture of Kristen Natividad

There are still a few days left to apply for this year's National Health Journalism Fellowship, Hunt Fund Grant and Packard Foundation Grant, and check out our health media job listings!

Picture of Kristen Natividad

This week, check out a handful of print openings at publications of various health disciplines. Also, keep an eye on upcoming deadlines for our 2012 fellowships and grants — these opportunities are not to be missed.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Why are nitrates from agriculture such a big problem for groundwater in California's fertile Central Valley?

Picture of Farida Jhabvala

Kern County, with similar geography and population to Fresno, decided to enter the new health insurance program called Bridge to Reform. On the way, Kern has stumbled upon many challenges, but for some patients, the program has changed their lives.

Picture of Farida Jhabvala

Radio journalist Farida Jhabvala examines how one facet of health reform might help uninsured families in Fresno, California's poorest county - but political leaders there don't want to participate.

Picture of Daniel Casarez

EPA's Jared Blumenfeld brings a little hope and money to San Joaquin Valley.

Picture of Joy Horowitz

Recent studies have found statistical links between pesticide use and an outbreak of Parkinson's disease in California farm towns. Researchers even know which chemicals are the likely culprits. What's the government doing about it? Not much.

Picture of Daniel Casarez

On a clear night in the southern Valley towns of Tulare, Huron and Tranquillity, you sometimes can see a full moon over the thousands of miles of agriculture. On a warm, summer evening, these harvest moons are brilliant to see. However, disturbing to this brilliant scenery is the stench of spray drift from pesticides that linger at night and the choking thickness of particulate matter, the smog considered one of the worst in the nation, that engulfs the Valley on warm days.

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