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Some lawmakers say they're disappointed that Senate President Earl Ray Tomblin slashed funding to fight substance abuse and to improve end-of-life health care.

Picture of William Heisel

The new report about the criminal histories of nursing home workers from the Office of Inspector General for Department of Health and Human Services has prompted many bold statements. What has been missing from all the alarmist analyses of this report are a few key facts and a sense of perspective.

 

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Are nursing home workers with criminal records really endangering residents? It's hard to tell from a new inspector general's report.

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This story is Part 11 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

Nearly 33 years after the federal government designated Gary a health professional shortage area and 17 years after federal health authorities qualified it as a medically underserved area, Gary continues to suffer from physician shortages.

Those shortages are partially to blame for the poor health status of many Gary citizens, according to local doctors and hospital officials.

Gary is home to disproportionately high numbers of severely ill patients suffering from multiple potentially life threatening conditions, including heart disease, kidney failure, diabetes, hypertension, obesity and asthma.

Picture of Alison Knezevich

West Virginia officials say they're disappointed that Florida's governor wants to kill a planned prescription drug monitoring program in the Sunshine State, which is a destination for people who deal pills.

Picture of Alison Knezevich

Prescription drug abuse is growing nationwide, but West Virginia was one of the first places hit by the problem. When I picked this topic, I didn't realize how complex it was. The drugs are widely available. Doctors are struggling to treat pain with effective medications without supplying drug abusers. And prescription drug crimes have proven difficult to prosecute.

This is the first in a four-part series examining prescription drug abuse in West Virginia.

Picture of Polly  Stryker

Health Dialogues examines the health of Native Americans in California. Have gambling revenues impacted the population's health status? We'll explore the current condition of Native American health, and hear from people doing something to help.

Picture of Dan Lee

The Rev. Clyde W. Oden is senior pastor of Bryant Temple African Methodist Episcopal Church. He was first appointed to the church by Bishop John R. Bryant in November 2002. One of the fastest growing A.M.E. churches in Southern California, Bryant Temple has developed a number of new ministries under the pastoral leadership of the Rev. Dr. Oden and his wife, Velma, including a heath ministry with a focus on diabetes, mental health, HIV/AIDS and bone marrow and blood donations, and a Free N One Ministry directed at people dealing with drug and alcohol addiction. The Rev. Dr.

Picture of Alison Knezevich

Some West Virginia lawmakers want to ban K2 and other so-called synthetic marijuana products, which are growing in popularity.

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This year saw a scorcher of a summer, the hottest on record. Worse, it could be the coldest summer we’ll see in our lifetimes. In this webinar, we’ll glean lessons and insights from a yearlong Los Angeles Times investigation into extreme heat. We’ll also identify gaps in state and federal tracking efforts, and outline policy changes that could help. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism's Impact Funds provide reporting support — funding and mentoring — to journalists who think big and want to make a difference. 

Apply today for our National Impact Fund for reporting on health equity and health systems across the country. 

Apply today for our California Impact Fund for reporting that brings untold stories to light in the Golden State. 

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