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Our weekly job listings, previously found at the end of once-a-week Career GPS posts, will now be featured in their own weekly posts. This week, we've found a variety of trade publications and specialty media outlets seeking reporters to cover health care beats. Also highlighted are listings for a freelance web producer and part-time internship. In addition, please find the most updated information on upcoming grants, fellowships and educational opportunities.

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When the Chicago City Council last week passed an ordinance to reduce emissions from construction equipment working on city jobs, it touched on a larger problem: harmful amounts of diesel exhaust in the city. Journalist Kari Lydersen found troubling emission levels in some neighborhoods.

 

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Who will be the winners and losers amid health reform's planned expansion of Medicaid? In her reporting, Danielle Ivory finds shifting power dynamics and unexpected financial risks for insurers. 

 

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It makes for a sad spring when I can’t attend the annual Association of Health Care Journalists conference.

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This story is Part 14 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

When Shantray Hooks, of Gary, lost her job as a restaurant cook in August, she didn’t know how she would pay for doctor visits.

“I had no health insurance and I couldn’t afford to pay a doctor,” said Hooks, 29, who was diagnosed with diabetes several years ago.

A doctor referred her to the Community Health Net of Gary, a federally qualified community health center that provides comprehensive primary care health services and charges on a sliding fee scale for services.

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Fishing for a health fraud lawsuit under the False Claims Act can be complicated if you just have a suspicion that something funny is going on. Here are some tips for finding these cases in your state.

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This story is Part 11 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

Nearly 33 years after the federal government designated Gary a health professional shortage area and 17 years after federal health authorities qualified it as a medically underserved area, Gary continues to suffer from physician shortages.

Those shortages are partially to blame for the poor health status of many Gary citizens, according to local doctors and hospital officials.

Gary is home to disproportionately high numbers of severely ill patients suffering from multiple potentially life threatening conditions, including heart disease, kidney failure, diabetes, hypertension, obesity and asthma.

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This story is Part 10 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

Methodist Hospitals’ financial turnaround has impressed hospital analysts and bond ratings agencies.

In May, New York bond-rating firm Standard & Poor’s changed its outlook on Methodist’s long-term bonds from negative to stable, reflecting its “improved operating performance and an improved balance sheet in fiscal 2009.”

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This story is Part 9 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

Dorothy Manley knew something was wrong nine years ago because whenever she ate sweets, she grew sleepy.

Manley, 77, of Gary, visited a local health fair and was advised to see her doctor.

“That’s when I found out I had diabetes,” said Manley, a former U.S. Postal Service supervisor who retired with 30 years of service in Chicago. The news frightened her because a former neighbor with uncontrollable diabetes lost an arm and both legs to amputation.

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This story is Part 6 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Indiana.

In the next three years Methodist Hospitals Northlake in Gary faces perhaps the greatest challenge of its 101-year history.

Health care reform is expected to reduce the rolls of uninsured Gary patients and expand health care access to thousands. But by 2014 the city’s only acute care hospital must figure out how to replace millions of dollars in government funding scheduled to disappear.

 

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