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Fishing for a health fraud lawsuit under the False Claims Act can be complicated if you just have a suspicion that something funny is going on. Here are some tips for finding these cases in your state.

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This story is Part 11 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

Nearly 33 years after the federal government designated Gary a health professional shortage area and 17 years after federal health authorities qualified it as a medically underserved area, Gary continues to suffer from physician shortages.

Those shortages are partially to blame for the poor health status of many Gary citizens, according to local doctors and hospital officials.

Gary is home to disproportionately high numbers of severely ill patients suffering from multiple potentially life threatening conditions, including heart disease, kidney failure, diabetes, hypertension, obesity and asthma.

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This story is Part 10 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

Methodist Hospitals’ financial turnaround has impressed hospital analysts and bond ratings agencies.

In May, New York bond-rating firm Standard & Poor’s changed its outlook on Methodist’s long-term bonds from negative to stable, reflecting its “improved operating performance and an improved balance sheet in fiscal 2009.”

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This story is Part 9 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

Dorothy Manley knew something was wrong nine years ago because whenever she ate sweets, she grew sleepy.

Manley, 77, of Gary, visited a local health fair and was advised to see her doctor.

“That’s when I found out I had diabetes,” said Manley, a former U.S. Postal Service supervisor who retired with 30 years of service in Chicago. The news frightened her because a former neighbor with uncontrollable diabetes lost an arm and both legs to amputation.

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This story is Part 6 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Indiana.

In the next three years Methodist Hospitals Northlake in Gary faces perhaps the greatest challenge of its 101-year history.

Health care reform is expected to reduce the rolls of uninsured Gary patients and expand health care access to thousands. But by 2014 the city’s only acute care hospital must figure out how to replace millions of dollars in government funding scheduled to disappear.

 

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This story is Part 5 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

Once a white washboard with dry erasable markers kept track of the patients in the emergency room at Methodist Hospitals’ Northlake Campus in Gary. The board listed the staff on duty and noted the patients and their ER bed numbers.

Like so many other things in health care, that technology is outdated, replaced by a computerized tracking system produced by the Verona, Wis.-based company that created Methodist’s electronic health record and health care information technology system, EPIC.

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With unions in urgent need of new blood, why wouldn’t they want to reach out to the 500 eager job-seekers at this fair? Conversely, what did these 500 job-seekers have against pipefitting?

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This story is Part 3 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

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This story is Part 2 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

Construction of a new teaching hospital in Gary may sound like a pipe dream. But it’s a pipe many area health and political leaders are still smoking.

The conversation begins like this: Wouldn’t it be wonderful if Methodist Hospitals and some unknown partners would build a replacement hospital in Gary close to the Indiana University Medical School-Northwest Campus near Interstate 94?

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"It's the alcohol hangover," Gerardo Cuapio thought five years ago when he woke up thirsty and with blurred vision. National Health Journalism Fellow Pedro Frisneda tells the story of a man who was on the verge of death without knowing he had Type 2 diabetes. It's a cautionary tale for what happens to many Latin American immigrants who move to the United States, adopting a new lifestyle and diet that can contribute to developing the disease. "The Big Apple is confronting one of the worst diabetes epidemics in the nation and health authorities have declared it an emergency," with Hispanics suffering disproportionately.

This story was originally published in Spanish. Below is the English translation.

Part 2: In the kingdom of fats and sugar

Part 3: In a sedentary country

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U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

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