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Child abuse

Picture of Patty  Machelor
"Fixing our foster care crisis” was made possible through major funding from the Community Foundation for Southern Arizona and additional support from the University of Southern California Annenberg Center's Fund for Journalism on Child Well-being. 
Picture of Patty  Machelor
"Fixing our foster care crisis” was made possible through major funding from the Community Foundation for Southern Arizona and additional support from the University of Southern California Annenberg Center's Fund for Journalism on Child Well-being. 
Picture of Patty  Machelor
"Fixing our foster care crisis” was made possible through major funding from the Community Foundation for Southern Arizona and additional support from the University of Southern California Annenberg Center's Fund for Journalism on Child Well-being. 
Picture of Patty  Machelor
The Arizona Department of Child Safety received more than 9,000 reports regarding child safety from Pima County residents during fiscal year 2016. About 2,100 of those reports resulted in children being removed from homes.
Picture of Patty  Machelor
When it comes to preventing child abuse and neglect, and addressing family dysfunction, few issues are as critical as addiction.
Picture of Patty  Machelor
More collaboration could help Arizona families avoid crises and keep children out of foster care, local service providers say.
Picture of Tessa Duvall
Cristian Fernandez was propelled to international notoriety when he was just 12, when he fatally beat his 2-year-old brother. But, after seven years of incarceration, how does a 19-year-old begin to move on?
Picture of Carol Marbin Miller
This article and others in this series were produced as part of a project for the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism’s National Fellowship, in conjunction with the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.
Picture of Patty  Machelor
Arizona tends to try out new approaches and programs, but rarely sticks with such efforts long enough to bring about change.
Picture of Ryan White
Are broad mandatory reporting requirements in cases of suspected child abuse good policy, or just good politics? Critics contend they can let real abuse cases fall through the cracks.

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