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child welfare

Picture of Kristin Gourlay

Rhode Island doesn’t have enough foster families to meet a growing need. That’s one reason the state's child welfare agency places a higher percentage of kids in group homes than almost any other state. Officials acknowledge the problem, but recruiting new foster families has been tough.

Picture of Kristin Gourlay

Rhode Island’s child welfare system is under the microscope. Gov. Gina Raimondo has called for a complete overhaul, saying the Department of Children, Youth, and Families has not only been mismanaged, but has failed the children and families it’s supposed to serve.

Picture of Kristin Gourlay

Social workers at Rhode Island’s Department of Children, Youth, and Families say they have too many cases to really make a difference in children’s lives. The agency is already facing criticism for other problems, including one of the nation’s highest percentages of foster children in group homes.

Picture of Ryan White

A casual observer watching the preschool-aged children bounce around the outdoor playground at the Children’s Institute wouldn’t immediately notice anything amiss. Except that these kids wouldn’t be here had something not already gone very wrong in their young lives.

Picture of Stephanie Woodard

The emergency room doctor was furious at the abuse heaped on Audre’y Eby's son. The boy's injuries would soon lead to an arrest warrant for the mother—not because she had caused the harm, but because she did not return her son, along with his wheelchair-bound twin, to their abusers.

Picture of Stephanie Woodard

My latest story, Rough Justice in Indian Child Welfare, provides a rare and shocking behind-the-scenes look at what can happen to Native children once they end up in the foster-care system, in this case in South Dakota.

Picture of Roseann Langlois

By the time 11-year-old Chandler Nash Elliott hung himself in his father's home, the state of Nevada had a nearly two-inch-thick case file full of abuse and neglect allegations that almost spanned the boy's lifetime.

Picture of Angilee Shah

Andy Miller used his own money to launch the nonprofit website Georgia Health News last month. He's now in the midst of seeking foundation grants and donations. This week at Career GPS, Miller straightforwardly answers some questions about developing his new media venture.

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Nowhere was the massive COVID wave of winter 2021 more devastating than in America’s nursing homes, where 71,000 residents died in the surge. In this webinar, we’ll hear from the lead reporter in the USA Today series "Dying for Care," who will show how an original data analysis and an exhaustive reporting effort revealed a pattern of unnecessary deaths that compounded the pandemic’s brutal toll. Sign-up here!

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