Skip to main content.

Children

Picture of Tracie Potts
COVID taught us a lot about feeding people, especially children. Here's how we can make the lessons stick.
Picture of David Martin Davies
Type 2 diabetes in children was rare 40 years ago, but not anymore, according to Dr. Jane Lynch, a professor of pediatric endocrinology at UT Health San Antonio.
Picture of David Martin Davies
Texas has a law that requires the screening of school children for diabetes. But due to COVID-19, in recent years, those screenings aren't always happening.
Picture of Taylor Walker
The coalition, said co-founder Lamikia Castillo, demanded “that the LA County Board of Supervisors change its practices,” so that “families are not pulled apart.”
Picture of Edwin Rios
Many people were kicked out despite eviction moratoriums—but certain communities faced the brunt of it.
Picture of Alex Stuckey
A Houston Chronicle investigation found that at no point since 2013 did any Texas school district have the nationally or state recommended student-to-provider ratios in four positions that are key to providing mental health support for children — nurses, counselors, case workers and psychologists.
Picture of Elizabeth Thompson
As schools have returned to in-person instruction, advocates for children say they’re starting to see an uptick in juvenile justice complaints. We look at how diversion works in other countries.
Picture of Elizabeth Thompson
Juvenile justice advocates see a disproportionate number of children with reading disabilities. The pandemic shed a light on those inequities.
Picture of Elizabeth Thompson
School-based juvenile justice complaints decreased when children were not in school during the pandemic, but what about now?
Picture of Elizabeth Thompson
When schools shut down at the beginning of the pandemic in 2020, juvenile delinquency complaints decreased. Here’s what it means — and what it doesn’t.

Pages

Announcements

“Racism in medicine is a national emergency.” That’s how journalist Nicholas St. Fleur characterized the crisis facing American health care this spring, as his team at STAT embarked on “Color Code,” an eight-episode series exploring medical mistrust in communities of color across the country. In this webinar, we’ll take inspiration from their work to discuss strategies and examples for telling stories about inequities, disparities and racism in health care systems. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team. 

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth