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chronic disease

Picture of Richard Bammer
This article was produced, in part, as a project for the USC Center for Health Journalism’s California Fellowship, a program at the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism....
Picture of Elizabeth Aguilera
Diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes when she was 11 years-old, Carolina takes three types of insulin and four other medications every day. Diabetes experts say the family's situation is fairly common.
Picture of William Heisel
A quick primer on the science of how obesity and high cholesterol can break down cartilage and bones, spurring the development of arthritis.
Picture of Rebecca Plevin
"It's our obligation to offer treatment in a manner that's rational and logical," said the county's chief medical officer. "We identify the individuals for initial treatment right now, based on how we can offer the most care to the most people, who are going to benefit from it the most now."
Picture of Ryan White
As researchers and policymakers seek ways to stop the damage wrought by toxic stress and early trauma, a leading thinker in the field suggests we need smarter approaches that take inspiration from precision medicine.
Picture of Jennifer Bihm
Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the program is mainly aimed at African American and Latino residents of public and low income housing. The project coincides, say organizers, with HUD’s proposed ban on smoking inside individual units.
Picture of William Heisel

The link between obesity and arthritis rates is fertile ground for reporters to explore. In areas of the south, the two strongly overlap. Is it possible that obesity is driving arthritis rates in these areas?

Picture of Anna Maria Barry-Jester

Looking through health statistics for the United States, there’s an area that almost always shows up in red: Alabama’s Black Belt. A stretch of fertile lands across the southern half of the state, it was one of the most brutal and wealthy parts of the country during the slavery era....

Picture of Swati Kapoor

“House calls go back to the origins of medicine, but in many ways I think this is the next generation,” Dr. Patrick Conway, CMS' chief medical officer, recently said. The practice is making a bit of a comeback among high-need patients.

Picture of Kathleen  Page

Children consume a bigger proportion of their daily calories from added sugars than adults, and the concerns go beyond nutrition. New research suggests that fructose can activate the brain's reward regions and generate hunger and cravings for other high-calorie foods.

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