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chronic disease

Picture of Jane Stevens

Tarpon Springs, FL, once known for harboring the nation’s largest sponge-harvesting industry, today boasts a new designation: it may be the first city in the country to declare itself a trauma-informed community.

Picture of Kate Long

West Virginia occupies a top slot on almost every awful health ranking: diabetes, heart disease, stroke, kidney disease and others.

Picture of Jane Stevens

Contrary to popular belief, resilience is not innate. If you stress a child long enough and don't provide any nurturing to recover from the stress, research shows that the effects are damaging and long-term.

Picture of Caitlin Buysse (Kandil)

Healthy food is in short supply in communities of color

Picture of Eddie North-Hager

While obesity is a problem for Americans in all walks of life, it’s worse when you don’t live near a park, when access to public transportation is limited, when sidewalks are broken and streetlights are few. In fact, a National Institutes of Health study found that just living in a socioeconomically deprived area leads to weight gain and a greater risk of dying at an early age. In stark terms, people in Culver City live an average of eight years longer than people in Jefferson Park, according to Crump. Yet these two communities in the middle of Los Angeles are only a couple of miles apart.

Picture of Kate  Benson

The association of a murine retrovirus with ME/CFS appears to be no longer viable, but many of the researchers who can't find XMRV in patients still believe that other viruses are at play.

Picture of Kate Long

A formerly sickly child, West Virginia's top health official finds himself in the position to affect the health of more than 400,000 West Virginians enrolled in Medicaid, DHHR's biggest program.

Picture of Kate Long

Journalist Kate Long's home state faces staggering health problems, prompting her project to explore West Virginia’s rising tide of chronic disease and obesity and the considerable efforts by its residents to reverse it.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

A little legwork can deliver compelling stories about how cancer treatment costs are affecting patients in your community, whether they’re  insured or not. Here are some tips and resources to jump-start your reporting.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Most Americans know what's killing us. Stop smoking, eat better, exercise, and wear your seatbelt — just those four simple steps, alone, could save hundreds of thousands of lives every year. Here are 10 ways to help people hear that message.

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Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States?  Apply now for one of our positions. 

The best journalism these days wraps compelling narratives around scrupulous data analysis. Apply now for our 2021 Data Fellowship to learn the skills necessary to use big data to inform your reporting on health and social welfare issues. Learn more in this webinar on Aug. 3.

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