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chronic diseases

Picture of Louise McCarthy
The growth of Los Angeles’ safety net has been dramatic since the Affordable Care Act took effect. Now clinics are anxiously wondering if the many changes they've made can be sustained if the ACA is repealed.
Picture of Erin Schumaker
“Everyone agrees that housing is an important determinant of health, but that’s very hard to measure because it’s overly correlated with other aspects of poverty,” said Thomas Waters, a housing policy analyst in New York City.
Picture of Merdies Hayes
The African American community has been witness to some of the worst health outcomes of any population. Officials at Martin Luther King Jr. Community Hospital in Watts are trying to remedy that situation by focusing on preventative health.
Picture of Merdies Hayes
This article was produced as a project for the USC Center for Health Journalism’s California Fellowship.
Picture of Julio Ochoa
The GOP's health care reforms would leave millions without insurance, and Florida could be hit harder than many other states. As a result, the Sunshine State's free clinics are gearing up for a wave of new patients.
Picture of Elizabeth Zach
In recent years, hospitals that serve small rural communities across the nation have closed their doors at a disquieting rate, essentially one per month.
Picture of Anna Maria Barry-Jester
Maps of the modern plagues of health disparities — rural hospital closings, medical provider shortages, poor education outcomes, poverty and mortality — all glow along this Southern corridor.
Picture of Michael  Hochman
U.S. spending on health care alone is large enough to make it the world's fifth largest economy. A more thoughtful, evidence-driven approach to delivering care could curb such staggering statistics.
Picture of Monya De
Need a Saturday scan? MRIs are much harder to come by on weekends at many hospitals. How can that still be in today's on-demand economy?
Picture of Monica Velez
In California’s Merced County, residents are more likely to be exposed to tobacco, suffer from poor air quality, or die of heart disease. At the same time, the region faces a long-running shortage of doctors.

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“Racism in medicine is a national emergency.” That’s how journalist Nicholas St. Fleur characterized the crisis facing American health care this spring, as his team at STAT embarked on “Color Code,” an eight-episode series exploring medical mistrust in communities of color across the country. In this webinar, we’ll take inspiration from their work to discuss strategies and examples for telling stories about inequities, disparities and racism in health care systems. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team. 

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