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chronic diseases

Picture of Padma Nagappan
Black women have twice the risk of developing breast cancer as white women, and three times the mortality rate. They also have far less access to screening.
Picture of Harvey Barkin
Cristina Sprague, a nurse practitioner in San Francisco, says the irony for many Filipino caregivers is that they often work 16-hour shifts as care providers but can’t provide care for their own children.
Picture of Matthew Bajko
Soon Californians will find themselves being asked to divulge their sexual orientation and gender identity to state health officials. But will people be willing to divulge such personal information?
Picture of Merdies Hayes
Can a revamped community hospital overcome a history of dysfunction and place residents of South Los Angeles on a path to better health and lower rates of chronic disease?
Picture of Michael  Hochman
When it comes to vaccines, the ongoing struggle against unsubstantiated fringe theories can eclipse other valid concerns about the frequency and type of vaccines doctors prescribe.
Picture of Wendy Ruderman
In the wake of reporting from two National Fellows, Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney said Monday that the city will begin to enforce a four-year-old law that requires landlords to certify that their properties are lead-safe before renting to families with young kids.
Picture of Hannah Esqueda
In the largely rural Central San Joaquin Valley, a reporter tracking efforts to expand access to health care in the wake of Obamacare finds that "many of the most effective outreach tools at play involve very little technology."
Picture of Elizabeth Zach
In California’s Central Valley and rural north, more than a dozen hospitals have closed since the early 2000s. The closures often limit care options and inflict economic misery — some communities never recover.
Picture of Monya De
Physicians are often terrible at heeding their own advice. "Among a trio of lung specialists I once knew, only one was not a chain smoker himself," writes Dr. Monya De. How does this happen?
Picture of Hannah Esqueda

More than two years after the Affordable Care Act took effect, members of Fresno’s traditionally underserved communities still struggle to find proper access, reports 2016 California Fellow Hannah Esqueda.

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Announcements

“Racism in medicine is a national emergency.” That’s how journalist Nicholas St. Fleur characterized the crisis facing American health care this spring, as his team at STAT embarked on “Color Code,” an eight-episode series exploring medical mistrust in communities of color across the country. In this webinar, we’ll take inspiration from their work to discuss strategies and examples for telling stories about inequities, disparities and racism in health care systems. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team. 

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