Skip to main content.

chronic diseases

Picture of Kate Long

Journalist Kate Long examines how some West Virginians are changing their lifestyles to drop pounds and reduce their risk of diabetes and other obesity-related diseases. West Virginia has one of the highest chronic disease rates in the nation.

Picture of Kate Long

Until the 1980s, few West Virginians are overweight in archival photos. In the 1960s and 1970s, during the poverty war, Americans got used to seeing pictures of bone-thin West Virginians on the evening news. Only 13.4 percent of Americans were obese then.

Picture of Kent Bottles

Anyone who is concerned about the future transformation of the United States clinical delivery system should pay attention to the Care Innovations Summit.

Picture of Kate Long

Experts have advised West Virginia to establish statewide diabetes management programs. Dannie Cunningham can testify that they work.

Picture of Kate Long

West Virginia occupies a top slot on almost every awful health ranking: diabetes, heart disease, stroke, kidney disease and others.

Picture of Kate Long

West Virginia is among the top five states on just about every national chronic disease list. Journalist Kate Long investigates what's behind the state's poor showing.

Picture of Jane Stevens

Contrary to popular belief, resilience is not innate. If you stress a child long enough and don't provide any nurturing to recover from the stress, research shows that the effects are damaging and long-term.

Picture of Caitlin Buysse (Kandil)

Diet of fruits and vegetables is ultimately cheaper, but Bostonians are hooked on fast, convenient food

Picture of Eddie North-Hager

While obesity is a problem for Americans in all walks of life, it’s worse when you don’t live near a park, when access to public transportation is limited, when sidewalks are broken and streetlights are few. In fact, a National Institutes of Health study found that just living in a socioeconomically deprived area leads to weight gain and a greater risk of dying at an early age. In stark terms, people in Culver City live an average of eight years longer than people in Jefferson Park, according to Crump. Yet these two communities in the middle of Los Angeles are only a couple of miles apart.

Picture of Shannon Muchmore

Is Oklahoma headed toward a crisis in access to health care? Health experts say yes — for many reasons. This three-part series examines the problems, how they affect all Oklahomans and what can be done to change the situation.

Pages

Announcements

“Racism in medicine is a national emergency.” That’s how journalist Nicholas St. Fleur characterized the crisis facing American health care this spring, as his team at STAT embarked on “Color Code,” an eight-episode series exploring medical mistrust in communities of color across the country. In this webinar, we’ll take inspiration from their work to discuss strategies and examples for telling stories about inequities, disparities and racism in health care systems. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team. 

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth