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California's Alameda County is trying a new angle to improve mental health care in black communities by tapping into African-American churches. Once members receive special training, their churches are declared places that can offer support and connect people to resources to find help.

Picture of Jazelle Hunt

Simone Oliver had always been called, as they say in the religious community. She was active in the Baptist church throughout her youth, playing piano for the youth choir and even ghostwriting sermons for several pastors as a teen.

Picture of Leiloni  De Gruy

When HIV/AIDS was thought of as a White, gay disease, it was often the suffering of Black patients that helped the world realize that it could affect anyone. Today, African-Americans remain the racial group most acutely affected by the epidemic.

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