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Clinical research

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"How is it supposed to work?" Answer that question and you're better prepared to spot when things go wrong.
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Medical devices undeniably save and improve lives, but they can also malfunction or prove to be defective and pose serious risks for patients. So, as someone in the medical field, how do you stay up-to-date on medical device safety and recalls? The FDA does its best to keep doctors informed about medical device recalls, but communication from the FDA doesn’t always reach doctors soon enough.

Picture of William Heisel

I wrote a piece recently for Health News Review about conflicts of interest. The original post is below, followed by more great examples of writers describing unexpected conflicts in detail.

Picture of William Heisel

A new company aims to clean up the FDA's messy data for reporting drug adverse events and market it to pharma and other businesses. Health reporters can benefit from the company's work, too.

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A pharma insider offers some strict rules for medical researchers to avoid pharma ghostwriting and other conflicts of interest in their work — and help save the reputation of medical science.

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Shannon Brownlee offers a not-so-modest proposal for universities to stamp out pharma ghostwriting benefiting researchers.

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Clinical trials aren't just about drugs. Should other interventions be given a pass because Big Pharma isn't involved?

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With only 17 to 18 percent of NIH grant applications funded this year - the lowest level on record - are RCTs costing millions, cost effective?

Picture of Manoj Jain

About a decade ago when I was newly settled into private practice in Memphis, a representative for a drug company marketing a new and powerful antibiotic stood in my office and asked whether I would like to attend a consultants' meeting about the drug in Washington.

Picture of William Heisel

It can be uncomfortable asking people about their finances. In journalism, though, there is an obligation not only to ask, but to ask for proof — especially with clinical trials.

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