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Picture of Almendra Carpizo
The four years I spent covering San Joaquin County included too many visits to homicide scenes and coroner’s name requests, but a cursory glance at the names and figures of the victims unsettled me.
Picture of April Ehrlich
Abandoning your home while fleeing a wildfire can be a traumatic experience. It’s even scarier if you don’t understand the language of the evacuation alerts chiming into your phone.
Picture of Luanne Rife
Ballad Health in October stopped performing surgeries at a Norton hospital, but it is unclear if and when patients or state regulators were notified.
Picture of Katharine Gammon
Only recently have researchers fully understood how critical “language nutrition” is for children’s cognitive growth. As a result, new programs aim to help parents increase their kids’ language skills.
Picture of Monya De

Primary care doctors used to receive more feedback from specialists on the status of referred patients. That happens far less these days, to the detriment of doctors' ongoing clinical education.

Picture of Ryan White

In the wake of studies finding big differences in language ability between rich and poor kids by the age of 18 months, a leading researcher outlines the latest thinking on how to bridge the class-based "word gap."

Picture of Katharine Gammon

It's well-known that there's a yawning gap between wealthier kids and their less affluent peers in the number of words heard as a child, a fact that has big implications for their future success. But do programs aimed at closing the gap work?

Picture of Michael  Hochman

This month, early results from one of the key efforts to transform primary care were published, and the results were underwhelming. But here's what we can learn from the initiative.

Picture of Ryan White

New technologies and alternative forms of care can help low-income patients feel more informed about their health. But all of those services can’t compete with the ultimate trump card: the doctor/patient relationship.

Picture of Erin  Gaab

Despite coping with numerous responsibilities, many families still choose to take part in research.

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Domestic violence affects tens of millions of Americans every year. Yet media outlets mostly treat incidents as "cops" items, if they cover them at all, as opposed to treating domestic violence as a public health problem. Our free two-day symposium will help journalists understand the root causes and promising prevention, intervention and treatment approaches.  Plus participants will be able to apply for grants to report California-focused projects.

The pandemic has unleashed a tsunami of misinformation, lies and half-truths capable of proliferating faster than the virus itself. In our next webinar, we’ll delve into what one of our speakers has termed “the natural ecology of bullshit” — how to spot it, how it spreads, who is most impacted, and how to counter it. And we’ll discuss reporting examples, strategies and story ideas that incorporate these insights and effectively communicate to diverse audiences. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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