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Congress

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Democrats and Republicans on the House Committee on Energy and Commerce have asked the leader of the Indian Health Service to address two investigations that highlighted serious lapses in the agency’s care for Native Americans.
Picture of Lenzy Krehbiel-Burton
An estimated 755,000 people would lose benefits over the next three years if the rule change proposed by the USDA goes into effect.
Picture of Ryan White
The stopgap bill approved by Congress this week will extend funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program for a few more months. That's far from what the program's supporters were hoping for.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
September 30 is the deadline for renewing coverage for about 9 million children nationwide, and there's been a flurry of media pieces pointing to this month's expiration date. But, is this federally-funded program really in jeopardy?
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Suggestions of health insurance policies with skimpy benefits and higher out-of-pocket costs might reduce part of the health insurance cost equation, but is that the kind of insurance system Americans really want?
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

A long-deferred attempt to reform mental health care advanced out a House committee this week. Here's a look at how the bill seeks to change "the nation's broken mental health system," and some of the coverage to date.

Picture of William Heisel

Thoughtful comparisons can make all the difference for your audience. For example, the threat of Ebola in the U.S. seems scary until you compare it to drunk drivers, who killed 12,000 in the U.S. in 2014. Ebola killed two.

Picture of Lisa   Bernard-Kuhn

The newly Republican-controlled Congress isn’t wasting time to take sharp aim at President Barack Obama’s health reform law. Here’s a look at the top bills, lawsuits and debates that could mean major changes.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

Is Obamacare really at risk now that Republicans have taken the Senate? The core of the law will likely survive, thanks to the presidential veto power. Still, sections of it could be pruned away by the legislature. Here are a few possibilities the media has highlighted.

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

The gun lobby loves the short memory of the American public and the news media. Who remembers that Aaron Alexis killed 12 at Washington's Navy Yard just three months ago, legally buying a shotgun two days before the rampage.

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Domestic violence affects tens of millions of Americans every year. Yet media outlets mostly treat incidents as "cops" items, if they cover them at all, as opposed to treating domestic violence as a public health problem. Our free two-day symposium will help journalists understand the root causes and promising prevention, intervention and treatment approaches.  Plus participants will be able to apply for grants to report California-focused projects.

The pandemic has unleashed a tsunami of misinformation, lies and half-truths capable of proliferating faster than the virus itself. In our next webinar, we’ll delve into what one of our speakers has termed “the natural ecology of bullshit” — how to spot it, how it spreads, who is most impacted, and how to counter it. And we’ll discuss reporting examples, strategies and story ideas that incorporate these insights and effectively communicate to diverse audiences. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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