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Connecticut,United States

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One would think the Dr. Earl Bradley horror show could not get worse.

The Delaware pediatrician was indicted in February on charges he brutally molested more than 100 children in a toy-filled basement.

Then Chris Barrish at the Delaware News Journal showed how even a story this bad could get uglier:

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There are several ways to secure one’s genetic line for at least another generation.

One can court another person, marry (or not), mate and bask in the many joys of parenthood.

Folks born without the proper equipment or in relationships that don’t allow for simple reproduction can arrange for an egg donor, sperm donor or surrogate mother to help carry one’s genes to a daughter or a son. Parenthood is just as fun.

And then there is what someday may be dubbed the Ramaley method.

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Dr. Patrick Dean has pulled off a magic trick to make Houdini proud.

The founder and president of GI Pathology, a national testing laboratory based in Memphis, Dean has practiced medicine without a license in at least two states. Practicing without a license is often a career killer for a physician. Not so with Dean.

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This post describes the Dart Society reunion I attended last month. Named after eminent psychiatrist Dr. Frank Ochberg, he fellows supports journalists who cover issues of trauma and violence to help them both tells stories about those issues with sensitivity and compassion and to deal with the emotional consequences of doing that work.

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This piece looks at the only majority-black nursing home in Illinois that earned the highest possible rating from Nursing Home Compare. The home is also noteworthy because it received that mark while having more than 85 percent of resident care paid for by Medicaid.

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This story distills a national analysis of nursing home data and finds that Illinois is the worst state in the country for black seniors seeking nursing home. Illinois has the highest number of poorly rated majority black facilities in the country and just one black nursing home that received an excellent rating from Nursing Home Compare.

We looked at black and white homes where a high percentage of resident care was paid for by Medicaid and found that the disparities between the two groups actually increased, rather than shrunk as some owners with whom we had spoken predicted.

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Misadministration. When a physician has made a horrible mistake with wide-ranging ramifications, the terms "negligence," "malpractice" even "incompetence" might come to mind. Now this wonderful euphemism glides onto the scene, draping the wreckage in a filigree of blamelessness, warding off trial lawyers and investigative journalists.

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Dr. Ivey is a board certified physician in both Family Medicine and Emergency Medicine. She completed her residency in family practice in 1984 (University of Connecticut, St. Francis Hospital). Dr. Ivey holds a Master's degree in health services management and policy from the George Washington University, and fellowship training in health policy and health services research from UC Berkeley. She is an adjunct associate professor with the School of Public Health and with the UC Berkeley-UCSF Joint Medical Program. Dr.

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Dr. Anthony Iton was named the senior vice president for health communities at The California Endowment in August 2009. Iton oversees the endowment's 10-year, Building Healthy Communities California Living 2.0 initiative. Prior to joining the endowment, Iton served as director of and health officer for the Alameda County Department of Public Health. He had a state-mandated responsibility to protect the county's health and had authority over all medical care and public health for the county. Previously, Iton was director of health and social services for the city of Stamford, Conn.

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