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Do you want to better report on drug addiction and treatment? Avoid having Slate’s Jack Shafer feature your work in his Stupid Drug Story of the Week feature? Then follow these 15 tips from veteran journalist Maia Szalavitz.

Picture of Yesenia Amaro

Some local entrepreneurs have been stunned because they failed to meet all the rules for the small-business tax credits in last year's highly vaunted federal health care law to help cover their health care costs.

Despite their disappointment, they're hopeful that another part of the law, which kicks in three years from now, is well worth waiting for.

Picture of Andrew Schorr

I had the opportunity to go behind the scenes of ABC's The View this week. I was a guest on what turned out to be a historic news day: The morning after the President announced Osama Bin Laden had been killed in a daring raid. When I had heard the news the night before I thought my segment, discussing my new book, The Web-Savvy Patient, would be bumped.

Picture of William Heisel

How one doctor could allow another doctor to use his license to order painkillers for a clinic being used as a front for a drug mill and still be allowed to operate with no restrictions on his license is a true mystery. Finally, William Heisel reports, Dr. Scott Bickman faces some sanctions.

Picture of Kelley Atherton

Del Norte County has a serious problem with tooth decay. In fact, the problem is spread across California — a recent study found that two-thirds of the state’s children have some form of tooth decay. Kelley Atherton finds out why.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

San Francisco's City Clinic has been dishing out frank talk about sex for 100 years. The shocking thing is not how much things have changed, but how much they haven't.

Picture of Danielle Ivory

Who will be the winners and losers amid health reform's planned expansion of Medicaid? In her reporting, Danielle Ivory finds shifting power dynamics and unexpected financial risks for insurers. 

 

Picture of Alison Knezevich

Administrators of a hot line that helps West Virginians find treatment for prescription drug abuse are worried the program will be forced to close. The Mountain State has the nation's highest rate of fatal drug overdoses, and most of those deaths involve prescription drugs. But officials with the West Virginia Prescription Drug Abuse Quitline say state leaders have not shown concern for their funding problems. The hot line launched in September 2008 with the help of $1 million from a lawsuit against Purdue Pharma, maker of the painkiller OxyContin. That money will run out next year, said Laura Lander, the program's clinical supervisor.

 

Picture of Alison Knezevich

Some lawmakers say they're disappointed that Senate President Earl Ray Tomblin slashed funding to fight substance abuse and to improve end-of-life health care.

Picture of Alison Knezevich

The head of the House of Delegates health committee is calling on Senate President Earl Ray Tomblin to increase funding to fight drug and alcohol abuse.

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