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Picture of Elaine Schattner

The December issue of Wired Mag­azine pro­files David Kirchhoff, CEO of Weight Watchers, in a story on new ways to measure calories and food. It’s an inter­esting piece, with several points worth con­tem­plating at the start of the year.

Picture of Ryan White

In the richest county in California lies a motley assemblage of residents living aboard a flotilla of weather-worn boats in a narrow bay sandwiched between Sausalito and Tiburon.

Picture of Rochelle Sharpe

I just posted the story that I wrote for The Center for Public Integrity, which focuses on how much money Medicare spends on unnecessary cancer screenings. It was a fascinating reporting journey and one that you may be able to partially replicate, as the debate heats up about the necessity of prostate cancer screening tests.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Can computer applications make people healthy (and companies profitable)?  The quest is on to develop a game-changer like Farmville.

Picture of Angilee Shah

Health apps, birth control, hunger stikes and mental health in today's Daily Briefing.

Picture of Ricki Lewis

How far are we from personal genome scans that yield long lists of risks, some meaningful, some not? Who will develop the criteria for what is meaningful, for what a patient should know?

Picture of Ricki Lewis

My mom, like millions of others, was handed "a vitamin" while pregnant with me in 1954. And so when I became a teenager, I began to drip, and was hauled off to the gyno. The label: DES daughter. It was scary.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

A tuberculosis prevention program that crosses borders, slashing Medicaid, Germany's E. coli outbreak and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

A little legwork can deliver compelling stories about how cancer treatment costs are affecting patients in your community, whether they’re  insured or not. Here are some tips and resources to jump-start your reporting.

Picture of Kimber Solana

Joel Aguilar has never been a gang member, but has three bullets in him nonetheless. The east Salinas teenager is largely paralyzed: He can move his neck, raise both his arms a few inches and move one wrist — the physical toll of a "gang-related" shooting that nearly killed him two years ago. Kimber Solana examines the psychological impact of gang violence on both victims and the community.

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