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Dartmouth Atlas

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How much time should elapse before a patient returns for a follow-up visit? The answer, of course, is that it depends on the situation. But as a recent JAMA article made clear, there are surprisingly few evidence-based answers to guide doctors here.

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Do you use the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care in your reporting? If not, you're missing out on a great source of data on how the costs and quality of health care vary across regions. Contributor William Heisel explains how to best make use of this resource.

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Don't wait for the next release of data, the next news release or next news conference. No matter where you live, there are local angles in the Atlas data. Read how you could mine the data anytime for local angles - even over the holidays.

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Why do so many Americans think health reform has been repealed? Answers and more in our Daily Briefing.

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Here’s what we’re reading today:

Outliers: A cautionary tale for health journalists: GoozNews’ Merrill Goozner details how an error of adjustment in the Dartmouth Atlas skewed media coverage of supposedly sky-high leg amputation rates in McAllen, Texas.

Mobile Health: NetworkWorld’s Paul McNamara takes issue with a new survey showing that 40 percent of us would pay for health care apps or services on our mobile devices.

Picture of Darshak Sanghavi

Media coverage of health care quality often hinges on a doctor's personality, rather than measured quality outcomes. Here's a quick primer for journalists looking to do better reporting.

Announcements

Domestic violence affects tens of millions of Americans every year. Yet media outlets mostly treat incidents as "cops" items, if they cover them at all, as opposed to treating domestic violence as a public health problem. Our free two-day symposium will help journalists understand the root causes and promising prevention, intervention and treatment approaches.  Plus participants will be able to apply for grants to report California-focused projects.

The pandemic has unleashed a tsunami of misinformation, lies and half-truths capable of proliferating faster than the virus itself. In our next webinar, we’ll delve into what one of our speakers has termed “the natural ecology of bullshit” — how to spot it, how it spreads, who is most impacted, and how to counter it. And we’ll discuss reporting examples, strategies and story ideas that incorporate these insights and effectively communicate to diverse audiences. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the Uited States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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