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Picture of Rusha Modi
There is a bizarre paradox in the culture of medicine: The system generates more data than ever, but questionable priorities are limiting our ability to effectively use it.
Picture of Ed Williams
The story of heroin in New Mexico's Rio Arriba County had been told too many times by the national media, leaving residents wary. But no journalist had invested the time to tell the personal stories of the community.
Picture of Ronald Campbell
"As a data journalist, let me state my bias: I do not like scorecards," writes veteran data journalist Ron Campbell. "I’m greedy. I want all the data, and I want to analyze it myself." Here's how you can start doing the same.
Picture of Liza Gross
California's psychiatric hospitals can be highly dangerous places, both for patients and staff. Lost work days and overtime pay are huge. But reporters looking to track down reliable data on assaults face an uphill climb.
Picture of Michael  Hochman
In order to see whether heart stents actually improved patients' lives, the VA health care system decided to ask them directly, before and after surgery. But does this approach work?
Picture of William Heisel
Despite their benefits, the use of sensors has stalled amid concerns that inaccurate readings could lead to sidelined players. Some worry games or even careers could be cut short by false positives. But is that a valid objection?
Picture of Ryan White
That's bad news, especially given ample research that has shown how critical engaging and speaking to young children is for building brains and spurring healthy development.
Picture of Kevin Lomangino
A look at how leading media outlets handled a potentially misleading piece of research data in a recent study on the use of gene tests in treating breast cancer.
Picture of Rebecca Plevin

How one reporter "fell down a data rabbit hole" while investigating how many Medicaid patients were denied costly hep C drugs, and what she'll do differently next time.

Picture of William Heisel

One of the biggest ways obesity can lead to arthritis is the way it works on joints. The extra pressure that comes with more pounds tends to break down the cartilage in the knees, hips and other joints.

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