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dementia

Picture of Monya De

The research base upon which medicine is built is constantly evolving. Open-mindedness and a willingness to constantly update one's knowledge are the best defenses against complacency, writes Dr. Monya De.

Picture of Jondi Gumz

When Tim Fitzmaurice lost his wife Ginny, his partner of 44 years, to dementia in 2014, his experience as her caregiver brought him so much pain and guilt that he kept it to himself. Until Tuesday, when he asked Santa Cruz County health staff to reach out to families dealing with dementia.

Picture of Frank Gluck

Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of dementia, is hitting older communities such as Southwest Florida hard, overwhelming retirement savings and loading more costs onto the region's already strained medical system, a five-month News-Press investigation found.

Picture of Frank Gluck

Experts estimate that as many as 55,000 Southwest Floridians have diagnosed or undiagnosed Alzheimer's disease. To better understand the disease's impact on the region, The News-Press in Fort Myers, Florida, interviewed experts on the disease and families now coping with it.

Picture of William Heisel

Industry groups have argued for a drug form that does not require a patient or family member signature. That possibility has raised deep concerns among some patient advocates, who point out the drugs' potential dangers.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

One way the Affordable Care Act aims to spur innovations in health care delivery is through the CMS Innovation Center. Four California-based projects give a sense of the kinds of programs and ideas the office is currently funding and tracking.

Picture of Susan Gilbert

A death notice in The New York Times last week caught the eye of one of my colleagues, who circulated it around the office. It was for an emerita professor of psychology at Cornell who committed suicide after receiving an Alzheimer’s diagnosis. Are there more such death notices to come?

Picture of William Heisel

New research suggests Alzheimer's disease is responsible for far more deaths than has been reported. The finding has major implications for health policy and research.

Picture of Frank Gluck

Alzheimer’s disease caregivers, usually elderly spouses or working adult children, face higher risk of physical and mental health problems such as anxiety, depression and heart problems. Stressed caregivers are 63 percent more likely to die within four years compared to non-caregivers.

Picture of Sandra Hausman

The plight of prisoners in California has received extensive coverage since a class action lawsuit alleged bad medical care behind bars violated the U.S. Constitution. In Virginia, however, there has been little reporting on the quality of health care for about 31,000 people in state prisons.

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