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Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism

Picture of Maureen OHagan

How one journalist tackled a project on childhood obesity:

 

"I learned a ton, but I can’t say I’d wish this experience on my worst enemy. Did I mention it’s a broad topic?"

Picture of Rong  Xiaoqing

Elder abuse, a growing but hidden problem for Chinese seniors in the United States, often originates when adult children here reject the tradition of filial piety. This is the second story of a two-part series.

Picture of Rong  Xiaoqing

Familial piety is so highly valued in the Asian culture, contributing to the image of Asian Americans as a model minority, that many people, including Asian Americans themselves, don't even realize that senior abuse exists in this community.

Picture of Angilee Shah

We are two weeks out from the dynamic week of seminars and conversations where this year's USC/California Endowment National Health Journalism Fellows and Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism grant recipients met each other and dived deeply into their reporting projects. If you're curious about what they're working on, here's a rundown. (Read more by clicking on fellows' names, and comment to give them ideas for their work.)

Picture of Christina Hernandez

Camden, New Jersey, which sits across the Delaware River from Philadelphia, is known as one of the nation’s most violent and impoverished cities. But as Camden’s mostly black and Latino residents navigate dangerous streets and crushing poverty, they also face a broken healthcare system. With limited access to primary care, about half of all Camden residents visit a hospital every year. The top 10 reasons for emergency room visits were all primary care issues, with the common cold topping the list.

Picture of Angilee Shah

Last week, the USC/California Endowment National Health Journalism Fellows were knee-deep in seminars and conversations about international trade, urban violence and community campaigns. As it turns out, these are all topics for a health beat. The National Health Journalism Fellows and Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism grant recipients convened in Los Angeles to expand their reporting horizons.

Picture of Rong  Xiaoqing

Last May was a big month for the Asian community. It was Asian and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, but was also the National Hepatitis B Awareness Month.

The prevalence of hepatitis B among Asians Americans is stunningly high—15% compared to 0.5% for average Americans. So there were many educational workshops and screenings offered by various organizations and institutions in the community through the month.

Picture of Angilee Shah

The National Health Journalism seminar begins on Sunday, when 15 National Health Journalism fellowship recipients (and five Dennis A.

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Announcements

This year saw a scorcher of a summer, the hottest on record. Worse, it could be the coldest summer we’ll see in our lifetimes. In this webinar, we’ll glean lessons and insights from a yearlong Los Angeles Times investigation into extreme heat. We’ll also identify gaps in state and federal tracking efforts, and outline policy changes that could help. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism's Impact Funds provide reporting support — funding and mentoring — to journalists who think big and want to make a difference. 

Apply today for our National Impact Fund for reporting on health equity and health systems across the country. 

Apply today for our California Impact Fund for reporting that brings untold stories to light in the Golden State. 

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