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dental disease

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In 14 Sarasota County schools, second-graders will have the chance to receive free dental sealants on their molars through a partnership between the Department of Health in Sarasota County and four local foundations.
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These days, hundreds of Texas pediatric dentists spend their days counseling parents about the importance of taking care of their young children’s teeth. Can Florida's troubled Medicaid dental program emulate Texas' success?

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In Florida's Manatee County, the lack of dental care was creating a crisis for children, and the chief witnesses were school nurses. In response, the county's health and education leaders have started working together to get kids into the dental chair.

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Keriana Carll cries in pain nearly every day. Her mouth hurts. The 4-year-old has such severe dental disease that she had to get her front tooth pulled. But no dentist in Florida's Sarasota or Manatee County was willing to treat her.

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Local communities and the federal government prioritize dental care, but Florida's state agencies don't have much to offer, according to a special series in the Sarasota Herald-Tribune.

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Only two of 103 listings were accurate, according to a Sarasota Herald-Tribune survey.

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If you want to know how tough someone’s life has been, look inside his mouth. Teeth are made of the hardest substance in the human body. But poverty, neglect and disease can crack them, break them, ruin them. The patients at the SOME dental clinic on O Street NW have been through a lot. Their teeth tell the story.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Yep, it's that time again: The University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation today released their second annual rankings of health in America's counties. And so I'm reposting some context and story ideas from last year's rankings - they're still applicable this year.

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Here’s what we’re checking out today:

Sniffle: A new study suggests that you’ll get fewer colds if you’re older, male and married. If you’re none of the above, getting regular exercise seems to prevent the sniffles, Julie Deardorff reports for the Chicago Tribune.

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The national story of poor dental health and its implications — former U.S. Surgeon General David Satcher called it a "silent epidemic" in 2000 — isn't getting the attention it deserves. Journalist Eric Eyre lays out the issues and offers tips for covering dental health in your community. 

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Nowhere was the massive COVID wave of winter 2021 more devastating than in America’s nursing homes, where 71,000 residents died in the surge. In this webinar, we’ll hear from the lead reporter in the USA Today series "Dying for Care," who will show how an original data analysis and an exhaustive reporting effort revealed a pattern of unnecessary deaths that compounded the pandemic’s brutal toll. Sign-up here!

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