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Department of Public Health

Picture of Barbara Laker
A year after a first grader was severely poisoned from peeling lead paint in his classroom, City Council on Thursday unanimously passed historic legislation aimed at ensuring such an injury never happens again.
Picture of William Heisel
Massachusetts started sending email warning alerts to drug prescribers in 2013. But while some measures of drug abuse dropped in the following years, it’s hard to give credit to the alerts.
Picture of Darryl Holliday
While the government banned lead-based paint in 1978, more than 75 percent of houses in Chicago were built before 1970, affecting children with lead poisoning.
Picture of Elaine Wong

Recent news about Chinese restaurant health and labor violations got this fellow's attention for a story idea about the health of their workers. Additionally, she plans to report on how well the restaurateurs are abiding by San Francisco's city-mandated health care provision.

Picture of Sara  Rubin

I'm honored to be participating in the California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship in LA later this month. My fellowship proposal is a deeper look at groundwater contamination, with arsenic and nitrates identified as the two worst offenders.

Picture of Michael Stoll

In 2007, San Francisco embarked on a rare and bold experiment, resolving to provide universal health care to its residents. Four years later, Healthy San Francisco has an enrollment of 54,000 people — between half and three-quarters of the estimated uninsured population. But the city has dug deep, and the program has earned less than expected from other sources. Can this ambitious program be sustained financially? The short answer, after a three-month investigation by the San Francisco Public Press: yes — but only if the economy picks up, federal grants continue to flow and businesses stop fighting health care mandates. The project, produced with the support of the USC Annenberg/California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship, appeared in November at SFPublicPress.org and as the cover story of the Public Press' quarterly broadsheet newspaper edition.

Picture of Michael Stoll

In 2007, San Francisco embarked on a rare and bold experiment, resolving to provide universal health care to its residents. Four years later, Healthy San Francisco has an enrollment of 54,000 people — between half and three-quarters of the estimated uninsured population. But the city has dug deep

Picture of Michael Stoll

The San Francisco Public Press, a startup news organization doing public-affairs reporting in the Bay Area, is producing an in-depth explanatory project examining the track record of a city-sponsored health care program called Healthy San Francisco.

Picture of Christina Jewett

Nursing homes in California have reaped $880 million in new funding from a 2004 state law designed to help them hire more caregivers and boost wages. But many homes did just the opposite.

Picture of Angilee Shah

Matt Goldberg says that he has "hands-down" the best job in the world. He works without times constraints and chases whatever stories he wants. He loves his boss, he loves his team.

"The only requirement I have is that I have to show up with big stories," he says.

Which begs two questions: What is this mythical job? And how does he consistently find big stories?

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