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depression

Picture of Victoria  Costello

An opinion piece, borne of personal experience and a decade of mental health reporting, arguing in favor of many proposed changes to the DSM-5 that would allow early intervention for common mental disorders.

Picture of Kate Long

Until the 1980s, few West Virginians are overweight in archival photos. In the 1960s and 1970s, during the poverty war, Americans got used to seeing pictures of bone-thin West Virginians on the evening news. Only 13.4 percent of Americans were obese then.

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Anyone who is concerned about the future transformation of the United States clinical delivery system should pay attention to the Care Innovations Summit.

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This was my final post as a blogger for Psychology Today.com. After two years and 110,000 page views, its editors decided my contributions "no longer met their editorial needs." Coincidence? You decide.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

The safety of bagged salads, Special K (not the cereal) for depression, FDA whistleblowers sue, and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

A town pushes back against fast food, surprising news about serotonin and depression, and a hospital chain's break with the Catholic church, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Victoria  Costello

How do you meld science reporting with a memoir of mental illness? Author and journalist Victoria Costello explores how and why she wrote her new book, "A Lethal Inheritance."

Picture of Jane Stevens

Contrary to popular belief, resilience is not innate. If you stress a child long enough and don't provide any nurturing to recover from the stress, research shows that the effects are damaging and long-term.

Picture of Erica Mu

A community’s mental health is difficult to quantify: It’s highly dependent on self-reporting and deeply entwined with cultural context. While physical health problems are easily spotted, mental health issues are harder to see – and often harder to fix.

Picture of Eddie North-Hager

While obesity is a problem for Americans in all walks of life, it’s worse when you don’t live near a park, when access to public transportation is limited, when sidewalks are broken and streetlights are few. In fact, a National Institutes of Health study found that just living in a socioeconomically deprived area leads to weight gain and a greater risk of dying at an early age. In stark terms, people in Culver City live an average of eight years longer than people in Jefferson Park, according to Crump. Yet these two communities in the middle of Los Angeles are only a couple of miles apart.

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