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depression

Picture of Suzanne Hurt
This story is part of a series on Dec. 2, 2015, terrorist attack survivors’ recovery and California’s workers’ compensation system. The project was undertaken for the USC Center for Health Journalism’s California Fellowship.
Picture of Ruben Castaneda
This article was produced as a project for the Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism, a program of the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism. It's the third in a series of stories exploring how the Trump administration's immigration policies are affecting the physical, mental and emotional
Picture of Gina  Torino
Both explicit racism and microaggressions can hurt the health and well-being of people of color, writes psychologist Gina Torino.
Picture of Claudia Boyd-Barrett
California spends an estimated $4 to $5 billion a year on mental health services for children and teens. Our goal is to find out whether access to mental health care is equitable across the state, as required by law.
Picture of Denisse Salazar
The headlines generated by Angel Secundino's killing faded quickly. But his death links four generations still struggling with the regrets, emotional wreckage and fear that come when loved ones become immersed in the gang lifestyle.
Picture of Ruben Castaneda
Dulce Castro, an 18-year-old DACA beneficiary, used to sleep eight hours a night, but since Trump announced he was ending the program on Sept. 5, she's been lucky if she gets four hours of uninterrupted rest.
Picture of Ruben Castaneda
More children of undocumented immigrants now live in fear and survival mode as the Trump administration’s aggressive immigration enforcement policies distress them as never before.
Picture of Nick Welsh
A new facility will offer medical and dental services  targeting those with mental-health and addiction issues -- the first of its kind in Santa Barbara and the only one between Los Angeles and San Francisco.
Picture of Linda Marsa
Houstonians may experience a public health crisis many orders of magnitude worse than the aftermath of other major storms.
Picture of Harold Pierce
So much of Luton’s childhood and adolescence seemed normal to her at the time. Her father mishandling her mother. Her brother coming after her with a metal poker. Her boyfriend with the meth addiction. All normal. It’s a wonder how she didn’t become a statistic herself.

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