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diabetes

Picture of Parimal Rohit

A reporting project on the rising incidence of diabetes among Indian communities finds virtue in taking an explanatory approach. "Linking our cuisine to impactful statistics and studies, I hoped, would grab the reader’s attention," California Fellow Parimal Rohit writes.

Picture of Parimal Rohit

India-West’s examination of the impact of diabetes within the Indian population continues with a look at an attempt to legislate efforts to reduce sugar consumption, how one diabetic patient lived with the disease for nearly 25 years, and ways to manage the chronic condition.

Picture of Sabrina Adler

There is a growing understanding that improving student health isn't just about serving healthier foods – it’s also about promoting healthier lifestyles. Reducing junk food marketing to children is a key part of that task, and San Francisco Unified has been at the leading edge of such efforts.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

People with insurance are significantly more likely to be diagnosed with a chronic condition than uninsured people. That means that as the number of insured grows, the health system will have to cope with an influx of patients newly diagnosed with conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure.

Picture of Avishay Artsy

Each year, about 140,000 Americans are diagnosed with colon cancer, and more than 50,000 die from it. That’s bad news, but for African-Americans, it’s even worse. KCRW reporter Avishay Artsy explains why.

Picture of William Heisel

How does someone argue against the seemingly seemingly rational argument that people should go on drinking as much soda as they want as long as they get exercise, too? With facts.

Picture of William Heisel

The sweetened-beverage industry frequently pushes the idea that you should be free to consume whatever you want as long as you exercise afterward. Maybe beverage warning labels should point out how long you'd need to exercise to burn off the calories.

Picture of Lisa Morehouse

Up to a million undocumented immigrants in California are expected to remain uninsured after the ACA is fully implemented in 2019. One California community is trying to meet some of the unmet health needs by partnering with community health centers and hosting a physician’s assistant once a week.

Picture of Marice Ashe

Akron, Ohio's Accountable Care Community has brought together a coalition of partners to reduce the number of residents suffering from chronic disease and treatment costs. Similarly, nonprofit hospitals elsewhere can do much more to improve the health of entire communities.

Picture of Eryn Brown

We all love firing up our cellphones to write a text or a tweet, or maybe to engage in a quick game of Candy Crush.  But could we turn to the tiny glowing screens to get healthier, too?

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