Skip to main content.

diabetes

Picture of Nick  Vidinsky

Studies have shown that breastfeeding significantly reduces health risks for babies and their mothers. So how many Californians are breastfeeding their babies? Not enough. See our interactive charts and sort the data by ethnicity, income and gender.

Visit Health Dialogues to view the graph:

http://www.kqed.org/assets/graph/breastfeeding/index.jsp

Picture of Norma De la Vega

I am a journalist with twenty five years of experience. I have worked as reporter in United States and Mexico. During the last ten years I worked for a weekly newspaper Enlace, which is part of the San Diego Union-Tribune. During that time, I covered two very important issues for Latinos: Education and Health.

While covering Education, I met Maria Chavez, former Executive Director for the San Diego County Office of Education, Migrant Education Program, a federal program focusing in the education of farmer-workers and their children, in San Diego and Orange Counties.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Here's a (belated) wrap-up of the Health 2.0 conference in San Francisco earlier this month, and some fodder for future stories.

Picture of Angilee Shah

From the opening keynote of this week's National Health Journalism Fellowship seminar, prevention and health beyond just health care have been common themes. Today's afternoon panelists gave examples of programs that take simple, novel approaches to integrating physical activity into people's daily lives.

Take a Walk

Picture of Dan Lee

Proper prenatal care contributes to healthier babies and mothers. Though access has been improving, minority women were twice as likely as white women to get prenatal care only in the third trimester, or not at all. Mothers who delay or forgo prenatal care are three times more likely to give birth to a low birth weight baby than mothers who do get care, which quintuples their baby's risk of dying, according to the U.S. Office of Women's Health. An estimated 84 percent of pregnant women in the U.S.

Picture of William Heisel

When medical board investigators questioned Dr. Robbi Borjeson about what she had done to treat a patient suffering from a severe case of diabetes, she responded: "I prayed over him."

Borjeson had visited the patient's home in January 2000, where she found him complaining of "fatigue, weight loss, increased thirst, increased urination and sores on his tongue," according to the Arizona Medical Board. She told him take some vitamins.

Picture of Angilee Shah

The National Health Journalism seminar begins on Sunday, when 15 National Health Journalism fellowship recipients (and five Dennis A.

Picture of Stephanie Innes

I'm looking forward to going to Los Angeles Oct. 4!

Working with my colleague, Mariana Alvarado, I'll be reporting on a project about the link between obesity and poverty in children. The Tucson area has a higher-than-average rate of poverty, which disproportionately affects ethnic minorities. Obesity is widespread in those populations and is particularly rampant among Hispanics and American Indians, who are developing type 2 diabetes at increasingly young ages.

Picture of Sara Shakir

The number of parks, fresh food stores, bicycle and jogging paths are influencing the spread of obesity and diabetes, particularly in minority communities, according to popular and scientific literature. I am reviewing the academic work been developed in several important cities that are trying to map out obesity and to correlated its prevalence with environmental factors. Recommendations and innovative solutions to the obesity epidemic in low income communities will be of particular interest.

Related work (comming soon!)

Picture of Manny Hernandez

It’s been five years since I started navigating the waters of social
media. I was trying to get a feel for what others were seeing in
MySpace, so I joined it and I soon joined Facebook too. Flickr,
YouTube, LinkedIn, Twitter and other sites were part of the plethora of
social media destinations I visited periodically. They all had one
thing in common: they allowed me to socialize and share with others
online.

Pages

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth