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In 2007, San Francisco embarked on a rare and bold experiment, resolving to provide universal health care to its residents. Four years later, Healthy San Francisco has an enrollment of 54,000 people — between half and three-quarters of the estimated uninsured population. But the city has dug deep, and the program has earned less than expected from other sources. Can this ambitious program be sustained financially? The short answer, after a three-month investigation by the San Francisco Public Press: yes — but only if the economy picks up, federal grants continue to flow and businesses stop fighting health care mandates. The project, produced with the support of the USC Annenberg/California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship, appeared in November at SFPublicPress.org and as the cover story of the Public Press' quarterly broadsheet newspaper edition.

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In 2007, San Francisco embarked on a rare and bold experiment, resolving to provide universal health care to its residents. Four years later, Healthy San Francisco has an enrollment of 54,000 people — between half and three-quarters of the estimated uninsured population. But the city has dug deep

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Manuel Pastor is professor of geography and American studies and ethnicity at the University of Southern California, where he also serves as director of the Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE) at the Center for Sustainable Cities and co‐director of the Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration (CSII). Founding director of the Center forJustice, Tolerance, and Community at UC Santa Cruz, Professor Pastor holds a doctorate in economics from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and has received numerous fellowships and grants.

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Biographical Sketch Dr. Manuel Pastor is Distinguished Professor of Sociology and American Studies & Ethnicity at the University of Southern California. Pastor holds an economics Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, is the inaugural holder of the Turpanjian Chair in Civil
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Murray Penner is the Deputy Executive Director of Domestic Programs at the National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors (NASTAD). Penner's primary responsibilities include oversight of the Care and Treatment, Prevention, Viral Hepatitis and Racial/Ethnic Health Disparities programs, including oversight of cooperative agreements with HRSA, CDC and the Office of Minority Health (OMH). Penner also oversees overall responsibility for NASTAD's National ADAP Monitoring and Technical Assistance program, which includes production of the National ADAP Report.

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