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Picture of Kelley Atherton

While funding for California's welfare programs has seen a steady decline over the past few decades, the state's financial crisis may mean even more severe cutbacks. Many who depend on these programs may face homelessness and illness as a result.

Picture of Kelley Atherton

While other social services are facing budget cuts, the funding to serve Del Norte County’s mentally ill population seems relatively secure.

Picture of Yesenia Amaro

Janna Rodriguez, one of the owners of J&R Tacos in Merced, wants to learn more about the specific provisions in the federal health care law designed to help small businesses such as hers. Her restaurant, which opened almost five years ago, employs eight part-time employees — and none of them receive health care benefits.

Picture of Bill Macfadyen

Catching a glimpse of the future of professional community journalism, I'm excited by what I see

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

In California’s agricultural Central Valley, clean water is surprisingly hard to come by, and expensive, for some of the region’s poorest residents. It’s not hard to make the connection between poor health and water that has been tainted by nitrates from agricultural runoff.

Picture of Kari Lydersen

When the Chicago City Council last week passed an ordinance to reduce emissions from construction equipment working on city jobs, it touched on a larger problem: harmful amounts of diesel exhaust in the city. Journalist Kari Lydersen found troubling emission levels in some neighborhoods.

 

Picture of Kimber Solana

Joel Aguilar has never been a gang member, but has three bullets in him nonetheless. The east Salinas teenager is largely paralyzed: He can move his neck, raise both his arms a few inches and move one wrist — the physical toll of a "gang-related" shooting that nearly killed him two years ago. Kimber Solana examines the psychological impact of gang violence on both victims and the community.

Picture of William Heisel

Dr. David C. Martin may be onto something. In three Antidote posts last week, he made the case that health care workers should not wear surgical scrubs out in public. If seen doing so, they should be confronted. Now, doctors are talking back. 

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

San Francisco's City Clinic has been dishing out frank talk about sex for 100 years. The shocking thing is not how much things have changed, but how much they haven't.

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