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Discrimination

Picture of William Heisel
Why do so many able-bodied actors take on roles portraying a person with disabilities?
Picture of April Ehrlich
When a major wildfire burns into an urban area, federal disaster officials are quick to offer financial help to people who lose their homes. But not everyone is eligible for aid after a wildfire.
Picture of Deidre McPhillips
Discrimination and segregation in America are nothing new. Measuring their effects on health, however, is.
Picture of Perla Trevizo
Perla Trevizo is a recipient of the University of Southern California Annenberg Center's Fund for Journalism on Child Well-being. Other stories in this series can be found here.
Picture of Gina  Torino
Both explicit racism and microaggressions can hurt the health and well-being of people of color, writes psychologist Gina Torino.
Picture of Gisela Telis
"The magic is in how we listen and how we ask," writes reporter Gisela Telis. "When reporting on people who are struggling or have struggled, give them space to let you in to their world, and be vulnerable enough to say: Help me understand."
Picture of Chinyere Amobi
Reporters Kameel Stanley and Ed Williams discuss ethics in journalism, with a focus on communities in crisis. They emphasize how taking the time to understand a community can lead to more compelling reporting.
Picture of Gisela Telis
This story was reported as a project for USC Annenberg's Center for Health Journalism National Fellowship. 
Picture of Michael LaForgia

For 30 years, the best school in Florida's Pinellas County was in a black neighborhood. Then the School Board stepped in.

Picture of Jeff  Kelly Lowenstein

Wright County Egg conducted the largest egg recall in U.S. history, withdrawing first 228 million eggs and then another 380 million. Many complaints were filed from people seeking compensation for health damages they claim to have suffered after eating eggs produced by these companies.

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Join us for a webinar on the crisis for women, the disproportionate burdens on women of color, and the short-and long-term consequences of the mass exodus of women from workforce. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the Uited States.? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

COVID-19 has made every journalist a health reporter, whether their usual beat is crime, education or county government.  Our 2021 California Fellowship will make anyone who attends a better health reporter -- and give you a reporting grant of $2,000-$10,000 and five months of mentoring while you work on an ambitious project. Deadline to apply: March 1.

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