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Picture of William Heisel
Instead of leaping onto the fearwagon when a bug seems to appear out of nowhere, check the science. Then consider seeking out the real infection hotspots in your community.
Picture of April Xu
April Xu wrote this story while participating in the 2018 National Data Fellowship.
Picture of Judith Mernit
The practice of harm reduction seeks not to shame people who use drugs into giving them up, but simply to provide them with the tools to improve their health.
Picture of William Heisel

When reporting on risk factors that shape health, it's not uncommon for critics to suggest you've confused causation with correlation. Here are three steps you can take to ensure your reporting can weather such storms of doubt.

Picture of Karen Davis

Whenever I hear a health care professional telling people with type 2 diabetes or who are worried about getting cancer from “red meat” or “processed meats” to eat more chicken, I cringe.

Picture of William Heisel

Reporters who have covered immigrant communities may have heard of the “healthy migrant effect.” Here are some of the factors at play in this phenomenon.

Picture of William Heisel

Reporters who have covered immigrant communities may have heard of the “healthy migrant effect.” Here are some of the factors at play in this phenomenon.

Picture of Debra  Sherman

Reuters reporter Debra Sherman shares research she's found about cancer and diet.

Picture of Giana  Magnoli

Getting coverage for the uninsured is a big part of the federal health-care reform, which goes into effect Jan. 1. Those just getting insured could require a huge amount of care and referrals, which stands to overburden providers until the system stabilizes.

Picture of Mikaela Conley

“HIV is the face of the forgotten people in this country,” Dr. Carlos Del Rio, an Atlanta-based AIDS expert, told me last February. Nevertheless, there continue to be "hot spots” where the disease thrives. Those areas are some of the most impoverished parts of major cities in the U.S.

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U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

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