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Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

I’ve been thinking lately about what we can learn from culture clashes within groups of people living with various diseases. Patient groups aren’t monoliths, but sometimes they’re covered as if they are. Journalists don’t always distinguish between people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, for example. That’s a bigger deal than you might think.
Picture of William Heisel

Everybody has worked with a jerk. Someone who steals credit for your work. Someone who berates their employees behind closed doors but turns on the smiles for the executives. Someone who is loathe to admit a mistake.

When that jerk is a physician, the consequences are steeper than bruised egos or misbegotten bonus pay. Patients can end up with the wrong medication. Surgery can be performed on the wrong organ. Someone who had an excellent chance at surviving a disease can be dead in seconds.

Picture of Rong  Xiaoqing

Last May was a big month for the Asian community. It was Asian and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, but was also the National Hepatitis B Awareness Month.

The prevalence of hepatitis B among Asians Americans is stunningly high—15% compared to 0.5% for average Americans. So there were many educational workshops and screenings offered by various organizations and institutions in the community through the month.

Picture of William Heisel

If relative risk is the guy that drug companies always want to have at the party, absolute risk is the guy who never gets invited, the total buzz kill, the guy who showed up with someone’s cousin once in a bad outfit and ended up mumbling to himself in the corner about how everything would be better if people just listened to him.

Picture of Peter Lipson

Dr. Lipson writes his own blog called White Coat Underground, contributes and helps edit at Science-Based Medicine, and contributes to The Science Business Blog at Forbes.com where this piece originally appeared.

Picture of Adriana Venegas-Chavez

Primary care may give way to specialization

Picture of Adriana Venegas-Chavez

Part 2: Researchers trying to find why people with disease fail to act against it. 

Picture of Adriana Venegas-Chavez

Part 1: Innovative ways are sought to get patients to follow their treatment 

Picture of Bernice Yeung

This piece -- part of my Prisons & Public Health news blog -- ran on Newsdesk.org as part of my ongoing exploration of the connection between prisoner reentry, public health and public safety.

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