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doctor shortage

Picture of Leoneda Inge
This report was produced as a project for the Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism, a program of the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism.  Other stories in the series include: What happens after a rural North Carolina health clinic closes?
Picture of Kerry Klein
"By the time I was finished, my reporting had covered not only the Valley’s marketing problem, but also federal and state laws dating back decades, executive orders, bills in Congress, visa programs, and more local, state-level and national trends than I could count."
Picture of Monica Velez
Even if the county ever gets a medical school, it is a long-term goal years away and many low-income patients need solutions now.
Picture of Monica Velez
For years Merced County has struggled to convince doctors to come live and work in the rural, impoverished Central Valley community, resulting in a ratio of about 45 doctors for every 100,000 residents.
Picture of Monica Velez
Horisons Unlimited Health Care filed for bankruptcy and closed all eight of its clinics, including five in Merced County. About 80 percent of Horisons patients were on Medi-Cal.
Picture of Kerry Klein
A new California law has allowed pharmacists to play a more integral role in managing patients alongside other providers — which could be good news for patients struggling to access doctors. But one major obstacle still stands in the way.
Picture of Kerry Klein
This reporting was undertaken as part of a project with the USC Center for Health Journalism’s California Fellowship. ...
Picture of Kerry Klein
Knowing this one simple truth can help areas experiencing physician shortages: Where doctors grew up can predict where they practice, but where they are trained is one of the biggest drivers.
Picture of Kerry Klein
While access to insurance coverage remains a national debate, in the San Joaquin Valley, getting to see a doctor isn’t always easy, even for people who have coverage.
Picture of Monica Velez
In California’s Merced County, residents are more likely to be exposed to tobacco, suffer from poor air quality, or die of heart disease. At the same time, the region faces a long-running shortage of doctors.

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