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domestic violence

Picture of Tim O'Shei
Successfully resettling refugees, which in Western New York is coordinated by a small group of local agencies, requires a complex set of community interactions.
Picture of Katherine  Kam
In our highly connected world, abusers use technology against victims to monitor, threaten, harass, and hurt them.
Picture of Katherine  Kam
The rise comes even as factors such as culture, racism, poverty and immigration status often make it harder for Asian American women to seek help.
Picture of Samantha Caiola
CapRadio healthcare reporter Sammy Caiola discusses her reporting on the intersection of race, police violence and sexual assault.
Picture of Claudia Boyd-Barrett
Domestic violence, the leading cause of homelessness among women and children, is increasing during the pandemic.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The chief of a domestic violence unit joined reporters from The Wall Street Journal and NBC News to share insights for covering this urgent story right now.
Picture of Katherine  Kam
Domestic violence poses a dire public health threat, but in many Asian households it’s still viewed as a private family matter.
Picture of Almendra Carpizo
Fifteen years ago, 53-year-old Alicia Corrales walked away from the grips of abuse that had occurred most of her life. Today, she not only continues to heal herself but also aims to aid others whose lives have been scarred and bruised by domestic violence.
Picture of Debra Varnado
Years after the National Black Women’s Health Project identified domestic violence as “the number one public health issue for women of African ancestry,” African-American women continue to be abused at disproportionately higher rates than other women and to be killed more often by a current or forme
Picture of Debra Varnado
A report published by the Los Angeles County Public Health Department shows economic hardship and an inability to support one’s family because monthly earnings do not cover monthly expenses may contribute to the disproportionate rates of domestic violence toward African-American women.

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Announcements

Domestic violence affects tens of millions of Americans every year. Yet media outlets mostly treat incidents as "cops" items, if they cover them at all, as opposed to treating domestic violence as a public health problem. Our free two-day symposium will help journalists understand the root causes and promising prevention, intervention and treatment approaches.  Plus participants will be able to apply for grants to report California-focused projects.

The pandemic has unleashed a tsunami of misinformation, lies and half-truths capable of proliferating faster than the virus itself. In our next webinar, we’ll delve into what one of our speakers has termed “the natural ecology of bullshit” — how to spot it, how it spreads, who is most impacted, and how to counter it. And we’ll discuss reporting examples, strategies and story ideas that incorporate these insights and effectively communicate to diverse audiences. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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