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domestic violence

Picture of Alissa Zhu
Experts and advocates working to combat domestic violence share insights in hopes of spurring smarter coverage.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Investigative reporters Marisa Kwiatkowski and Melissa Jeltsen share guidance.
Picture of Natasha Senjanovic
Rachel Louise Snyder and Melissa Jeltsen discuss strategies for telling stories about domestic violence.
Picture of Ryan White
From PTSD to traumatic brain injuries, two experts on domestic violence trauma brief reporters on what we know from the science — and still don't.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
A survey of Californians sheds new light on how the pandemic is shifting attitudes.
Picture of Tim O'Shei
Successfully resettling refugees, which in Western New York is coordinated by a small group of local agencies, requires a complex set of community interactions.
Picture of Katherine  Kam
In our highly connected world, abusers use technology against victims to monitor, threaten, harass, and hurt them.
Picture of Katherine  Kam
The rise comes even as factors such as culture, racism, poverty and immigration status often make it harder for Asian American women to seek help.
Picture of Samantha Caiola
CapRadio healthcare reporter Sammy Caiola discusses her reporting on the intersection of race, police violence and sexual assault.
Picture of Claudia Boyd-Barrett
Domestic violence, the leading cause of homelessness among women and children, is increasing during the pandemic.

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