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domestic violence

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This is one in a series of articles, running between Thanksgiving and January, examining the relationship between housing loss and death in San Francisco. Check out the previous articles in the series, 

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Elder abuse, a growing but hidden problem for Chinese seniors in the United States, often originates when adult children here reject the tradition of filial piety. This is the second story of a two-part series.

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By the time 11-year-old Chandler Nash Elliott hung himself in his father's home, the state of Nevada had a nearly two-inch-thick case file full of abuse and neglect allegations that almost spanned the boy's lifetime.

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Surgeon General Regina Benjamin got an earful today from participants in a conference call unveiling a high-level prevention council and strategy called for in the new health reform law.

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When most men beat their spouse or girlfriend, they have to contend with the consequences. What will their wife say at work about that black eye? What will their girlfriend tell the ER doc when asked how she broke her arm?

Dr. Alex Argotte, a bariatric surgery specialist in Paducah, Kentucky, was accused not only of beating his girlfriend – repeatedly – but also of sneaking her into a hospital to give her an X-ray and check the damage done.

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Get your week rolling with these tidbits from around the web:

Live Now: Forbes' Matthew Herper is blogging the Food and Drug Administration’s Avandia review in real time.

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The New York Times reported in September that domestic violence programs in the state of California have have been largely eliminated. The Domestic Violence Program's last $16 million was cut completely in July, in efforts to close a near $24 billion state budget deficit.

Violence is a public health problem, said Eve F. Sheedy, Deputy City Attorney, Domestic Violence Legislative and Policy Advisor in the Los Angeles City Attorney's Office. It matters to public health that these resources have been cut.

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Journalist Emily Schmidt had a rare opportunity to humanize the often-hidden story of domestic violence, and some of the systemic judicial problems that arise in connection with it. Here's what she learned.

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The wave of attacks against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders has been emotionally gutting for these communities. In our next webinar, we’ll examine the impact of the crisis on the mental health of Asian Americans, especially the women who are often targeted. Join us for a deep discussion to inform your coverage of the crisis and broader reporting on AAPI communities. Sign-up here!

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Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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