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domestic violence

Picture of Scott  Anderson
Stories of undiagnosed PTSD among Hmong and Vietnamese American refugees are common in some California communities. What can their experiences tell us about future health impacts facing incoming Syrian refugees?
Picture of Debra Krol
A shortage of Native foster families has led to pain, lawsuits, and echoes of a painful history.
Picture of Carol Marbin Miller
This article and others in this series were produced as part of a project for the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism’s National Fellowship, in conjunction with the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism....
Picture of Harold Pierce
So much of Luton’s childhood and adolescence seemed normal to her at the time. Her father mishandling her mother. Her brother coming after her with a metal poker. Her boyfriend with the meth addiction. All normal. It’s a wonder how she didn’t become a statistic herself.
Picture of Bryana Kappa
How one young child learned to cope with some early traumatic experiences and tell his story in a new way, through child-parent therapy.
Picture of ChrisAnna Mink
A young boy and his mother fled vicious gang violence in Central America, but the nightmares have followed him to Los Angeles. The lingering effects of trauma now pose a whole new threat to his health.
Picture of Ed Williams
Research shows early childhood education is one of the most effective ways to prevent drug use later in life. That’s especially important in New Mexico's Rio Arriba County, where an opioid epidemic has been raging for decades.
Picture of Ed Williams
Española, New Mexico, has had one of the highest rates of heroin addiction in the country for decades. It’s a public health crisis that can create particular challenges for pregnant moms and their doctors.
Picture of Jeffrey Hess
Community violence and a visit to the doctor might seem unrelated. But for people living in violent communities, and the police who patrol them, it's often more closely related than people think.
Picture of Emily  Cureton

"It’s around 10 p.m. when I call a crisis worker for victims of domestic violence in remote Northern California," writes reporter Emily Cureton. "I’m panicking, 150 miles away in Oregon. I’m really afraid someone is going to get hurt tonight."

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