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drinking water

Picture of Sara  Rubin

It's a rare instance when groundwater contamination can be linked to a specific polluter and specific practices, but the Central Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board has ordered a Monterey County landowner and grower to provide a drinkable water supply.

Picture of Terria  Smith

Torres Martinez Desert Cahuilla Indian Reservation residents were instructed by the EPA 10 years ago not to drink the tap water. Any resident who is not an elder must provide his own drinking water. Everyone still uses the contaminated ground water to bathe and wash their dishes and clothes.

Picture of Sara  Rubin

I'm honored to be participating in the California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship in LA later this month. My fellowship proposal is a deeper look at groundwater contamination, with arsenic and nitrates identified as the two worst offenders.

Picture of Collin Tong

We may have plenty of clean water for our own needs, but if anything that has only spurred more interest in helping the rest of the world.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Why are nitrates from agriculture such a big problem for groundwater in California's fertile Central Valley?

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

In California’s agricultural Central Valley, clean water is surprisingly hard to come by, and expensive, for some of the region’s poorest residents. It’s not hard to make the connection between poor health and water that has been tainted by nitrates from agricultural runoff.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Who knew that Tennessee had the highest percentage (41%) of high school kids who drank more than one sugary soda a day? Check out these story ideas from a new CDC state-by-state report on “food environments” for children.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Does our drinking water have too much fluoride in it? Answers and more in our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Tracy Wood

For the first time, this fellowship gives me the opportunity to do a health story right.

Health issues usually mean big trouble when it’s breaking news or an investigative story.

Agent Orange. Ebola virus. West Nile. H1N1. In their time, viruses, pesticides and other causes of sudden, mass illnesses have forced all of us who cover the news to drop what we’re doing and take a crash course in an unexpected health crisis.

Picture of Shahid Ali  Panhwer

Post flood diseases spearhead amid crumbled lives stumble to clutch a bit of safety in early flood-hit areas of Pakistan. The havoc triggered by floods has already robbed more than 1400 lives, rendered 3 to 4.5 million people affected leaving a severely dented infrastructure and threatens to aggravate further if not addressed properly.

Calamity hit displaced population with poor access to safe drinking water, sanitation, adequate shelter, primary healthcare facilities and other basic needs remain highly vulnerable to various health risks.

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