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While the cliffhanger presidential election took center stage Tuesday, voters also decided a host of health-related measures.
Picture of Alexandra Demetriou
Addiction experts are pushing health care professionals to reexamine the way they discuss opioid addiction with patients and change how the establishment trains young doctors.
Picture of Giles Bruce
Kateri Whiteside looked at the pictures of her six kids on the wall: boys and girls, from toddlers to adults. She hasn't seen some of them for years.
Picture of Kerry Klein
Despite the chokehold heroin and pain pills have had on public health for years, Bakersfield cops are dealing with far more than opioids.
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This reporting is supported by the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism National Fellowship.
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We're asking distinguished reporters to highlight an issue or story that is either being missed entirely or underreported by the media.
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It's a disturbing trend: Across Texas, the number of women awaiting trial in county jails has jumped by 48 percent since 2011. At the peak this year in August, more than 6,300 women were jailed before trial, up from under 4,000 in 2011.
Picture of Denisse Salazar
The headlines generated by Angel Secundino's killing faded quickly. But his death links four generations still struggling with the regrets, emotional wreckage and fear that come when loved ones become immersed in the gang lifestyle.
Picture of Ed Williams
If there’s any police department that understands what an opioid epidemic means for a community, it’s New Mexico's Española Police Department. Even the chief of police has had addiction struggles within his own family.
Picture of Samantha Caiola

African-American children die at more than twice the rate of other children in California's Sacramento County, a new Bee investigation finds.

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