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Picture of Samantha Caiola

In California's Sacramento County, black children die at twice the rate of white children. The Sacramento City Council recently approved $750,000 for a county-led effort to lower the high death rate by connecting families with gang violence prevention, foster care assistance, health care and more.

Picture of Lane Anderson

While Americans tend to think of sex trafficking as a problem that happens overseas, the United States is a major sex trafficking hub for obvious reasons—it's a rich country. An estimated 100,000 children in the U.S. are forced into the sex trade every year.

Picture of Joaqlin Estus

Joaqlin Estus produced this story while participating in The California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowships, a program of USC's Annenberg School of Journalism. It was originally published by Alaska Public Radio.

Picture of Neda Iranpour

As the country tries to find a way to regulate, tax, legalize, or punish people for buying, growing, and using marijuana - it's high time we find out the long term effects. 

Picture of Joe Szydlowski

In far Northern California, which already is besieged by methamphetamine, law enforcement, doctors and community leaders have noticed another drug is snaking its way back into the black market’s customer base: Heroin.

Picture of Evan George

Heroin addiction grabbed the national spotlight recently after famed actor Philip Seymour Hoffman died on Super Bowl Sunday. He was almost certainly not alone that day — about 100 Americans die every day from drug overdoses. Can anything be done to stop this?

Picture of William Heisel

A grieving father set out to create a system that might prevent other lives from being lost at the hands of a drug-dazed driver. Ten years later, he's still waiting for the system he created to be fully realized.

Picture of Jill  Braden Balderas

A compelling patient or researcher makes a story engaging; concrete statistics make a story valid. Data, however, aren’t always clear-cut, and experts disagree on interpreting and applying it. Statistics on gun violence and how to reduce it fall prey to the same dichotomy.

Picture of Gergana Koleva

An ambitious plan to reverse New York’s growing prescription drug epidemic is causing a rift between legislators and health care providers, pitting a proposed computer system that would require doctors and pharmacists to meticulously scan patients’ medical history for patterns of abuse against arguments by two professional associations that increased monitoring would backfire.

Picture of Angilee Shah

Prescription drug abuse, contraception, psychiatry and obesity -- today in the Daily Briefing we look at some of the biggest health stories from fresh angles.

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