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Education

Picture of Annette Fuentes

There is a world of difference in how districts provide healthy school lunches. One key difference is money—both the income levels of school districts and the cost of lunch programs. Another is the food culture of diverse communities, so to speak, and what kids and their families are used to eating. In districts like Oakland, which participate in the federally and state subsidized lunch programs, the nutrition services have just $2.74 per meal to deliver a lunch that meets guidelines--and that kids will want to eat. Affluent districts such as Orinda don't participate in the subsidized lunch program and may serve catered lunches that are a lot like food they would eat at home.

Picture of Marice Ashe

With escalating obesity rates and growing interest in “buying local,” it’s a prime moment for health reporters to shine a light on how local government leaders can build momentum for a strategy many communities have long ignored.

Picture of Bob Butler

Reporters covering truancy often conclude that poor students and students of color who skip school do so because they don't care about education. But many of the students want to go to school but can't for a variety of reasons.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Should pizza be restricted to "save us from ourselves?" Answers and more in our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Yesenia Amaro

From greener school lunches to required nutritional information printed on fast-food menus, it's clear that state and federal governments are urging Americans to take control of their health -- starting with food. This is part four in a four-part series.

Part one: Convenience often trumps nutrition

Part two: Committed to nutrition

Part three: Providing healthier choices

 

Picture of Yesenia Amaro

In an effort to promote healthier eating habits among students, Merced County school officials are eliminating foods high in fat from school meal offerings and replacing them with fruits, vegetables and other nutritious alternatives. This is part three in a four-part series.

Part one: Convenience often trumps nutrition

Part two: Committed to nutrition

Part four: No escape from healthy lifestyle effort

Picture of Kelley Atherton

In Del Norte County, groups such as the Children's Health Collaborative seek funding in a push to provide more nutritious meals at high schools and encourage students to make healthier food decisions.

 

 

Picture of Kelley Atherton

A group of parents, educators and nutrition experts are making strides to break the cycle of unhealthy food choices among students in the Del Norte County Unified School District.

Picture of Annette Fuentes

Bay Area school nutrition directors say higher nutrition standards are good, but expensive.

Picture of William Heisel

How did William Hamman, the United Airlines pilot who faked being a cardiologist, get away with it? By speaking with authority and knowing that nobody was going to bother to fact-check his résumé, including the Wisconsin Medical Examining Board.

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The USC Center for Health Journalism's Impact Funds provide reporting support — funding and mentoring — to journalists who think big and want to make a difference. 

Apply today for our National Impact Fund for reporting on health equity and health systems across the country. 

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