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Education

Picture of William Heisel

What does it take for a doctor to lose his license to practice permanently? A patient dead from "therapeutic misadventure?" A formal finding of unprofessional conduct? Advanced age? Maybe not.

Picture of Catherine Stifter

Why is the high school dropout rate in the San Joaquin Valley among the highest in the California? CapRadio will produce a documentary that tells stories of youth and adults touched by the dropout crisis with accuracy, depth, nuance and respect.

Picture of Ryan White

If you could do one thing to ensure that you had a long, healthy life, what would you do? If you have less than a high school degree at 25, you can expect to live another 44 years, on average. Those with a graduate degree, however, can expect to live another 60 years, on average.

Picture of Taunya English

After several years on the health beat, I've learned that covering health more comprehensively means paying more attention to how people’s health is affected by where they live.

Picture of William Heisel

The Bakersfield Californian recently took on one of the most ambitious health care quality projects I have seen attempted by an outlet outside of the really big markets. One reporter, Kellie Schmitt, wanted to answer two questions: whether most of the doctors in Kern County were from another country and whether that mattered.

Picture of Tammy Worth

The surprisingly intense pushback against a proposed ban on school bake sales in Mass. is just the latest example of how hard it is for schools to improve their nutrition — and kids' health. 

Picture of Jane Stevens

At Lincoln High School in Walla Walla, WA, teachers and staff have received training about the link between trauma and learning. In this school, discipline is an issue of health — mental and physical. Because if you aren't healthy, it's difficult to learn.

Picture of Vicky Hallett

When Redskins tight end Chris Cooley swung by Orr Elementary School in Anacostia last Thursday, he explained to the 100 kids circled around him that he'd already exercised that day. "So hopefully I can keep up with you," he said. Fat chance of that.

Picture of Raquel Orellana

Are you interested in writing about medical education, research and clinical care? Or are you a student looking for a paid summer internship? We've got options for you.

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The USC Center for Health Journalism's Impact Funds provide reporting support — funding and mentoring — to journalists who think big and want to make a difference. 

Apply today for our National Impact Fund for reporting on health equity and health systems across the country. 

Apply today for our California Impact Fund for reporting that brings untold stories to light in the Golden State. 

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